Size–weight illusion — Oxford Reference

10 ENGLISH BOOKS RELATING TO «SIZE-WEIGHT ILLUSION»

Discover the use of

size-weight illusion

in the following bibliographical selection. Books relating to

size-weight illusion

and brief extracts from same to provide context of its use in English literature.

1

Handbook of Psychology, Experimental Psychology

In the late 1800s (Charpentier, 1891; Dresslar, 1894), the discovery of the size-weight illusion — that given equal objective weight, a smaller object seems
heavier — pointed to the fact that multiple physical factors determine heaviness …

Irving B. Weiner, Donald K. Freedheim, 2003

2

Touching for Knowing: Cognitive Psychology of Haptic Manual …

The size-weight illusion has been studied, frequently with an attempt to
determine if the illusion is linked to visualization. In this illusion, people tend to
overestimate the weight of a smaller object. One frequently reported explanation
is cognitive …

Yvette Hatwell, Arlette Streri, Edouard Gentaz, 2003

The phenomenon is called the size-weight illusion, or Charpentier’s illusion,
although it was discovered by the German psychologists Georg Elias Muller and
Friedrich Schumann in 1889, It is not as easy to explain as it at first appears.

4

Motor Control: Theories, Experiments, and Applications

The fact that participants in all three groups fully adapted their lift forces to the
inverted size–weight objects and yet exhibited striking differences in the strength
and direction of the size–weight illusion supports the claim (Flanagan and
Beltzner …

Frederic Danion, PhD, Mark Latash, PhD, 2010

This distortion of weight perception is known as the size-weight illusion: A large
and small object of the same mass do not appear to be equally heavy; rather, the
large object is judged to be lighter than the small one (Charpentier, 1891).

Lynette A. Jones Department of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Susan J. Lederman Department of Psychology Queen’s University, 2006

6

Handbook of Demonstrations and Activities in the Teaching of …

Charpentier (1891) first introduced the size-weight illusion. When lifting two
objects that are identical in weight but different in size, the larger object seems to
be lighter than the smaller object. Several cues affect the strength of the illusion …

Mark E. Ware, David E. Johnson, 2013

7

Handbook for Teaching Introductory Psychology

Charpentier (1891) first introduced the size-weight illusion. When lifting two
objects that are identical in weight but different in size, the larger object seems to
be lighter than the smaller object. Several cues affect the strength of the illusion …

Michelle Rae Hebl, Charles L. Brewer, Ludy T. Benjamin, Jr., 2001

8

Psychology of Touch and Blindness

Size-Weight Illusion In the size-weight illusion, if we have two objects of the same
weight, but the volume of one object is much larger than that of the other; the
smaller object is felt to be heavier. Thus a pound of copper will feel much heavier
 …

Morton A. Heller, Edouard Gentaz, 2013

9

Issues in Neurological Surgery and Specialties: 2011 Edition

Scientists discuss in ‘Bayesian and “anti-Bayesian” biases in sensory integration
for action and perception in the size-weight illusion‘ new findings in life sciences.
According to recent research from the United States, “Which is heavier: a pound …

10

Human Haptic Perception: Basics and Applications

The influence of an object’s size produces the size–weight illusion. A large and a
small object of the same mass do not seem to be equally heavy. That is, a large
object of the same mass of a small object perceived by touch is judged lighter …

TENDENCIES OF USE OF THE TERM «SIZE-WEIGHT ILLUSION»

The term «size-weight illusion» is used very little and occupies the

154.747

position in our list of most widely used terms in the

English dictionary

FREQUENCY

Rarely used

The graph expresses the

annual evolution of the frequency of use

of the word «size-weight illusion» during the past 500 years. Its implementation is based on analysing how often the term «size-weight illusion» appears in digitalised printed sources in English between the year 1500 and the present day.

Find out what the national and international press are talking about and how the term

size-weight illusion

is used in the context of the following news items.

Blind human echolocators can recognize the shape, size, and …

Interestingly, other experiments Goddale conducted indicated that blind expert echolocators are also subject to illusions, for example the size-weight illusion in … «Science a Gogo, May 15»

盒子重了吗?失明人士和失聪人士的错觉

某课题组正在针对著名的形重错觉(size-weight illusion)开展研究,这种错觉自19世纪90年代起一定程度上就得到的公认,其基本前提是当一个人面对两个重量相同而 … «cdstm, Mar 15»

This Box is Heavier; I Can Just Hear it! Illusions of Sight and Sound …

The last time someone told you to look at an optical illusion, they probably … One group of researchers was studying the well-known size-weight illusion, which … «Scientific American, Jan 15»

Echolocation may help visually impaired with mobility

The latest experiment involved what’s called the size-weight illusion. Researchers studied three groups: people who were sighted; those who were visually … «CTV News, Jan 15»

Illusions Fool Even the Blind

Now, a study reports that human echolocators can experience illusions, just as … sighted individuals succumbed to what is known as the “size-weight illusion. «New York Times, Jan 15»

Some Blind People Use Echolocation to ‘See’

«The sighted group, where each member was able to see how big each box was, overwhelmingly succumbed to the ‘size-weight illusion‘ and experienced the … «WebMD, Jan 15»

How Echolocation Substitutes For Eyes In Vision Impaired People

«The sighted group, where each member was able to see how big each box was, overwhelmingly succumbed to the ‘size-weight illusion‘ and experienced the … «Science 2.0, Dec 14»

Echolocation Gives Blind People Vision-Like Qualities: Could Be …

Researchers from the Brain and Mind Institute at Western University in Canada recruited participants, blind and not, to participate in a size-weight illusion. «Medical Daily, Dec 14»

Echolocation acts as supplemental sense for the blind

The size-weight illusion is the name given to the phenomenon whereby people underestimate the weight of the larger of two boxes with the same mass. «UPI.com, Dec 14»

Study proves blind people — and sighted — can use echoes as a …

The study compared the reactions of sighted and blind people to a classic test called the “size-weight illusion.” The subjects had to lift two boxes of equal weight … «Ottawa Citizen, Dec 14»

Definition of size-weight illusion in the English dictionary

The definition of size-weight illusion in the dictionary is a standard sense illusion that a small object is heavier than a large object of the same weight.

尺寸,重量错觉

1,325 millions of speakers

आकार वजन भ्रम

380 millions of speakers

Розмір — вагу ілюзія

40 millions of speakers

Examples of use in the English literature, quotes and news about size-weight illusion

TRANSLATION OF SIZE-WEIGHT ILLUSION

Find out the translation of

size-weight illusion

to

25 languages

with our

English multilingual translator

.

The

translations of size-weight illusion

from English to other languages presented in this section have been obtained through automatic statistical translation; where the essential translation unit is the word «size-weight illusion» in English.

Translator English — Chinese

尺寸,重量错觉

1,325 millions of speakers

Translator English — Spanish

ilusión tamaño — peso

570 millions of speakers

Translator English — Hindi

आकार वजन भ्रम

380 millions of speakers

Translator English — Arabic

حجم الوزن الوهم

280 millions of speakers

Translator English — Russian

Размер — вес иллюзия

278 millions of speakers

Translator English — Portuguese

ilusão de tamanho peso

270 millions of speakers

Translator English — Bengali

আকার-ওজন বিভ্রম

260 millions of speakers

Translator English — French

taille — poids illusion

220 millions of speakers

Translator English — Malay

Ilusi berat badan

190 millions of speakers

Translator English — German

Größe — Gewicht Illusion

180 millions of speakers

Translator English — Japanese

サイズ、重量錯覚

130 millions of speakers

Translator English — Korean

크기 무게 환상

85 millions of speakers

Translator English — Javanese

Ilusi ukuran-bobot

85 millions of speakers

Translator English — Vietnamese

kích thước , trọng lượng ảo tưởng

80 millions of speakers

Translator English — Tamil

அளவு எடை மாயை

75 millions of speakers

Translator English — Marathi

आकार-वजन भ्रामक

75 millions of speakers

Translator English — Turkish

Boy ağırlığı illüzyonu

70 millions of speakers

Translator English — Italian

dimensioni — peso illusione

65 millions of speakers

Translator English — Polish

wielkość — waga iluzja

50 millions of speakers

Translator English — Ukrainian

Розмір — вагу ілюзія

40 millions of speakers

Translator English — Romanian

iluzie dimensiune — greutate

30 millions of speakers

Translator English — Greek

ψευδαίσθηση του μεγέθους — βάρους

15 millions of speakers

Translator English — Afrikaans

grootte gewig illusie

14 millions of speakers

Translator English — Swedish

storlek — vikt illusion

10 millions of speakers

Translator English — Norwegian

størrelse og vekt illusjon

5 millions of speakers

TENDENCIES OF USE OF THE TERM «SIZE-WEIGHT ILLUSION»

The term «size-weight illusion» is used very little and occupies the

154.747

position in our list of most widely used terms in the

English dictionary

.

FREQUENCY

Rarely used

FREQUENCY OF USE OF THE TERM «SIZE-WEIGHT ILLUSION» OVER TIME

The graph expresses the

annual evolution of the frequency of use

of the word «size-weight illusion» during the past 500 years. Its implementation is based on analysing how often the term «size-weight illusion» appears in digitalised printed sources in English between the year 1500 and the present day.

10 ENGLISH BOOKS RELATING TO «SIZE-WEIGHT ILLUSION»

Discover the use of

size-weight illusion

in the following bibliographical selection. Books relating to

size-weight illusion

and brief extracts from same to provide context of its use in English literature.

1

Handbook of Psychology, Experimental Psychology

In the late 1800s (Charpentier, 1891; Dresslar, 1894), the discovery of the size-weight illusion — that given equal objective weight, a smaller object seems
heavier — pointed to the fact that multiple physical factors determine heaviness …

Irving B. Weiner, Donald K. Freedheim, 2003

2

Touching for Knowing: Cognitive Psychology of Haptic Manual …

The size-weight illusion has been studied, frequently with an attempt to
determine if the illusion is linked to visualization. In this illusion, people tend to
overestimate the weight of a smaller object. One frequently reported explanation
is cognitive …

Yvette Hatwell, Arlette Streri, Edouard Gentaz, 2003

The phenomenon is called the size-weight illusion, or Charpentier’s illusion,
although it was discovered by the German psychologists Georg Elias Muller and
Friedrich Schumann in 1889, It is not as easy to explain as it at first appears.

4

Motor Control: Theories, Experiments, and Applications

The fact that participants in all three groups fully adapted their lift forces to the
inverted size–weight objects and yet exhibited striking differences in the strength
and direction of the size–weight illusion supports the claim (Flanagan and
Beltzner …

Frederic Danion, PhD, Mark Latash, PhD, 2010

This distortion of weight perception is known as the size-weight illusion: A large
and small object of the same mass do not appear to be equally heavy; rather, the
large object is judged to be lighter than the small one (Charpentier, 1891).

Lynette A. Jones Department of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Susan J. Lederman Department of Psychology Queen’s University, 2006

6

Handbook of Demonstrations and Activities in the Teaching of …

Charpentier (1891) first introduced the size-weight illusion. When lifting two
objects that are identical in weight but different in size, the larger object seems to
be lighter than the smaller object. Several cues affect the strength of the illusion …

Mark E. Ware, David E. Johnson, 2013

7

Handbook for Teaching Introductory Psychology

Charpentier (1891) first introduced the size-weight illusion. When lifting two
objects that are identical in weight but different in size, the larger object seems to
be lighter than the smaller object. Several cues affect the strength of the illusion …

Michelle Rae Hebl, Charles L. Brewer, Ludy T. Benjamin, Jr., 2001

8

Psychology of Touch and Blindness

Size-Weight Illusion In the size-weight illusion, if we have two objects of the same
weight, but the volume of one object is much larger than that of the other; the
smaller object is felt to be heavier. Thus a pound of copper will feel much heavier
 …

Morton A. Heller, Edouard Gentaz, 2013

9

Issues in Neurological Surgery and Specialties: 2011 Edition

Scientists discuss in ‘Bayesian and “anti-Bayesian” biases in sensory integration
for action and perception in the size-weight illusion‘ new findings in life sciences.
According to recent research from the United States, “Which is heavier: a pound …

10

Human Haptic Perception: Basics and Applications

The influence of an object’s size produces the size–weight illusion. A large and a
small object of the same mass do not seem to be equally heavy. That is, a large
object of the same mass of a small object perceived by touch is judged lighter …

10 NEWS ITEMS WHICH INCLUDE THE TERM «SIZE-WEIGHT ILLUSION»

Find out what the national and international press are talking about and how the term

size-weight illusion

is used in the context of the following news items.

Blind human echolocators can recognize the shape, size, and …

Interestingly, other experiments Goddale conducted indicated that blind expert echolocators are also subject to illusions, for example the size-weight illusion in … «Science a Gogo, May 15»

盒子重了吗?失明人士和失聪人士的错觉

某课题组正在针对著名的形重错觉(size-weight illusion)开展研究,这种错觉自19世纪90年代起一定程度上就得到的公认,其基本前提是当一个人面对两个重量相同而 … «cdstm, Mar 15»

This Box is Heavier; I Can Just Hear it! Illusions of Sight and Sound …

The last time someone told you to look at an optical illusion, they probably … One group of researchers was studying the well-known size-weight illusion, which … «Scientific American, Jan 15»

Echolocation may help visually impaired with mobility

The latest experiment involved what’s called the size-weight illusion. Researchers studied three groups: people who were sighted; those who were visually … «CTV News, Jan 15»

Illusions Fool Even the Blind

Now, a study reports that human echolocators can experience illusions, just as … sighted individuals succumbed to what is known as the “size-weight illusion. «New York Times, Jan 15»

Some Blind People Use Echolocation to ‘See’

«The sighted group, where each member was able to see how big each box was, overwhelmingly succumbed to the ‘size-weight illusion‘ and experienced the … «WebMD, Jan 15»

How Echolocation Substitutes For Eyes In Vision Impaired People

«The sighted group, where each member was able to see how big each box was, overwhelmingly succumbed to the ‘size-weight illusion‘ and experienced the … «Science 2.0, Dec 14»

Echolocation Gives Blind People Vision-Like Qualities: Could Be …

Researchers from the Brain and Mind Institute at Western University in Canada recruited participants, blind and not, to participate in a size-weight illusion. «Medical Daily, Dec 14»

Echolocation acts as supplemental sense for the blind

The size-weight illusion is the name given to the phenomenon whereby people underestimate the weight of the larger of two boxes with the same mass. «UPI.com, Dec 14»

Study proves blind people — and sighted — can use echoes as a …

The study compared the reactions of sighted and blind people to a classic test called the “size-weight illusion.” The subjects had to lift two boxes of equal weight … «Ottawa Citizen, Dec 14»

My colleagues, Geoff Bingham and Qin Zhu, have recently published some fascinating data which has emerged from their work on the uniquely human skill, long-distance throwing. This is a novel and rich perception-action task which Bingham and Zhu (and recently, me) have been investigating for some time, with many interesting results. I’ll get onto blogging about this project once I’ve caught up with the coordination studies and have had some time to get my head around the data I’m helping generate.

I wanted to blog about this new paper, though, because it’s an exciting result which deserves all the attention it gets. The result is about the

size-weight illusion

, one of the most robust illusions around. As I’ve

talked about before

, illusions are a concern to ecological psychologists only in that they suggest the task has been incorrectly characterised. This paper presents data that suggests the size-weight illusion is actually

functional

, and that it reflects the readiness of the human perception-action system to throw objects long distances.

The size-weight illusion

The

size-weight illusion

is, as I said, extraordinarily robust. It is typically described as a mis-perception of weight. Two objects of the same weight but different sizes are misperceived as being of different weight, with the larger one rated as lighter. People seem unable to perceive weight without taking size into account. 

There are two basic types of theories about the cause of the illusion (references from Zhu {amp}amp; Bingham, 2010)

  1. Top down: You expect the larger item to weight more, so you prepare to lift a heavier weight and the illusion is caused by it feeling lighter than you expected (e.g. Ross, 1966). This is ‘top’down’ in the sense it is being caused by an expectation, a cognitive state;
  2. Bottom up: People actually perceive a complex variable composed of both size and weight and use this in their judgements (e.g. the inertia tensor, Amazeen {amp}amp; Turvey, 1996; density, Huang, 1945). This is ‘bottom-up’ in that it is about perception.

None of these types of theory have ever quite been able to fully explain all the data (indeed, the inertia tensor hypothesis was recently explicitly tested and rejected in a paper by Bingham’s group that is under review, although it’s still an area of active research). Both approaches entail some learning, but children as young as 18 months reliably show the illusion (Kloos {amp}amp; Amazeen, 2002). The expectation account fails because the illusions persists when people are fully informed about the weight of the objects, and the illusion persists even when people are actually performing lifts appropriately for the correct mass (Mon-Williams {amp}amp; Murray, 2000); there’s no evidence in their lifting behaviour that the person was initially surprised.

Zhu {amp}amp; Bingham then suggest that, given the illusion seems to be about perceptual experience, rather than online action control, perhaps it is about an

affordance

. Gibson (1979) suggested that these are what animals perceive in order to control their behaviour; they are real properties of the environment, but

not necessarily properties as described by physics

. The illusion suggests that the affordance in question should require the perception of both the size and weight of an object; such an affordance is the throw-ability of an object.

The dynamics of throwing

Throwing an object to a maximum distance means optimising the parameters of projectile motion. Some of these parameters are constant or out of the control of the thrower (e.g. gravity, air resistance). Some of the parameters are about the action of throwing (release angle, release velocity) — these are what the thrower must control to produce a throw. 

Critically, some of the parameters are about the object: for a given set of other parameters, maximising the distance of a projectile motion requires a specific combination of object size and weight. For throwing, this combination must fall within the range that is graspable and liftable by a human. By hypothesis, this relationship needs to be perceived when selecting an object to throw if you wish to maximise the distance of your throw, and empirically humans are very good at selecting the size/weight combination they can, actually, throw the furthest (e.g. Zhu {amp}amp; Bingham, 2008). Imagine the common game of throwing stones into a lake; we have very clear preferences about which stones we think we can throw the furthest, and these preferences are very accurate. Stable, accurate performance implies informational control (although the specific information variable being perceived has, as yet, failed to reveal itself; e.g. Zhu {amp}amp; Bingham, 2010).Information implies an affordance, and the critical object property for throwing is a combination of size and weight. Perceiving the affordance of ‘throwable-to-a-maximum-distance’ would require perceiving this combination. How does this variable, whatever it’s precise form is, relate to the size-weight illusion?

The experiment

The study was simple. 12 participants (all capable of throwing a tennis ball 20m) were asked to make two separate sets of judgements about a set of objects. These were 48 balls which had been custom made; they came in 6 sizes (all graspable) and each size came in 8 weights (all liftable; see Table 1 in the paper for details). 

Participants then made two judgements about the objects; 

First, they were presented with a row of objects all the same size but different weights, and asked to choose and rank the 3 objects they thought was best suited for maximum distance throwing. Participants were allowed to hold and heft the objects (palm up, moving at the wrist).

Second, the participants were asked to heft a comparison object, and then asked to choose  and rank the 3 objects from each size set which felt about the same heaviness. The comparison object was either the object selected for throwing from the smallest set, or from the largest set.

In each case, the three choices were combined into a weighted mean, with the first, second and third choices weighted as .5, .33 and .17 respectively. This weighted mean allows for the fact that the object set contains discrete weights and sizes, and the actual ‘equivalent weight’ may not exist in the set although be on the continuous function the set samples; the weighted mean can then be a legitimate value that just doesn’t exist in the set. The results are in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Mean selected object weights for throwing judgments and heaviness

judgments as a function of object sizes (from Zhu {amp}amp; Bingham, 2010)

The dark line shows the object weights judged as optimal for throwing to a maximum distance as a function of size; larger objects need to be heavier to be optimal. The dotted line shows the object weights judged as equal heaviness to an object of a different size but that had been selected as optimal for throwing. At each size, an object of different weight was required before people thought it was equally heavy to the small or large comparison object; this is the size-weight illusion. People don’t just pick any different weight, however; they pick specific objects. In fact, the weight chosen was the weight identified by those people as the optimal weight to throw to a maximum distance. In other words, objects at different sizes which afford throwing to a maximum distance all feel equally heavy.

Summary

The implication is clear: people do not misperceive weight as a function of size, they correctly perceive the optimal size-weight (heaviness) value for throwing to a maximum distance. The size-weight isn’t an illusion, it is a side effect of asking a perceptual system to judge weight when what that system perceives is heaviness; throwability. The size-weight illusion therefore reflects a functional capacity of the human perception-action system.

This capacity seems to be unique to humans (apes and monkeys famously throw faeces, but not far and not accurately), and it is possibly an intrinsic capacity of humans. Zhu {amp}amp; Bingham speculate that the nervous system is ‘ready’ to be able to throw in the way it is ‘ready’ to learn language; what’s innate isn’t a module (a la Chomsky’s universal grammar), but a perceptual bias — here, the tendency to perceive not size, nor weight, but heaviness. Throwing has long been thought a critical skill that helped us hunt animals otherwise too strong for us (e.g. mammoths) and it has been suggested the skill enabled to us to keep hunting successfully in the face of climate change during the last Ice Age. It is therefore exactly the type of skill you might expect to be favoured strongly by evolution; these data suggest we are indeed ‘ready’ to throw in just this way.

References

Zhu, Q., {amp}amp; Bingham, G. (2011). Human readiness to throw: the size–weight illusion is not an illusion when picking the best objects to throw. Evolution and Human Behavior DOI: 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2010.11.005

GRAMMATICAL CATEGORY OF SIZE-WEIGHT ILLUSION

Size-Weight illusion

is a

noun

A

noun

is a type of word the meaning of which determines reality. Nouns provide the names for all things: people, objects, sensations, feelings, etc.

Find out the translation of

size-weight illusion25 languages

with our

English multilingual translator

The

translations of size-weight illusion

from English to other languages presented in this section have been obtained through automatic statistical translation; where the essential translation unit is the word «size-weight illusion» in English.

Translator English — Chinese

尺寸,重量错觉

1,325 millions of speakers

Translator English — Spanish

ilusión tamaño — peso

570 millions of speakers

Translator English — Hindi

आकार वजन भ्रम

380 millions of speakers

Translator English — Arabic

حجم الوزن الوهم

280 millions of speakers

Translator English — Russian

Размер — вес иллюзия

278 millions of speakers

Translator English — Portuguese

ilusão de tamanho peso

270 millions of speakers

Translator English — Bengali

আকার-ওজন বিভ্রম

260 millions of speakers

Translator English — French

taille — poids illusion

220 millions of speakers

Translator English — Malay

Ilusi berat badan

190 millions of speakers

Translator English — German

Größe — Gewicht Illusion

180 millions of speakers

Translator English — Japanese

サイズ、重量錯覚

130 millions of speakers

Translator English — Korean

크기 무게 환상

85 millions of speakers

Translator English — Javanese

Ilusi ukuran-bobot

85 millions of speakers

Translator English — Vietnamese

kích thước , trọng lượng ảo tưởng

80 millions of speakers

Translator English — Tamil

அளவு எடை மாயை

75 millions of speakers

Translator English — Marathi

आकार-वजन भ्रामक

75 millions of speakers

Translator English — Turkish

Boy ağırlığı illüzyonu

70 millions of speakers

Translator English — Italian

dimensioni — peso illusione

65 millions of speakers

Translator English — Polish

wielkość — waga iluzja

50 millions of speakers

Translator English — Ukrainian

Розмір — вагу ілюзія

40 millions of speakers

Translator English — Romanian

iluzie dimensiune — greutate

30 millions of speakers

Translator English — Greek

ψευδαίσθηση του μεγέθους — βάρους

15 millions of speakers

Translator English — Afrikaans

grootte gewig illusie

14 millions of speakers

Translator English — Swedish

storlek — vikt illusion

10 millions of speakers

Translator English — Norwegian

størrelse og vekt illusjon

5 millions of speakers

Quick Reference

A powerful cognitive illusion that causes approximately 98 per cent of people to judge an object to be heavier than another object of the same weight but much larger size when the two are lifted by hand.

In a simple home demonstration of the illusion, pieces of lead or other heavy material may be placed in two different-sized containers and surrounded by sand to prevent them from moving about and from being visible if the containers are transparent, and the weights of the containers may be adjusted until they are identical, whereupon the smaller container will feel much heavier than the larger one.

In a classic experiment on this illusion, 100 US military officers judged a smaller object to be on average two and a half times as heavy as one that was the same weight but twice the size in each dimension.

The illusion was first reported in 1889 by the German psychologists Georg Elias Müller (1850–1934) and Friedrich Schumann (1863–1940). It is sometimes classified as a tactile illusion. Also called Charpentier’s illusion.

From: 

size-weight illusion 
in 

A Dictionary of Psychology »

Subjects:Science and technology


Psychology

Reference entries

Translator English — Polish

ilusión tamaño — peso

570 millions of speakers

حجم الوزن الوهم

280 millions of speakers

Размер — вес иллюзия

278 millions of speakers

ilusão de tamanho peso

270 millions of speakers

আকার-ওজন বিভ্রম

260 millions of speakers

taille — poids illusion

220 millions of speakers

Ilusi berat badan

190 millions of speakers

Größe — Gewicht Illusion

180 millions of speakers

サイズ、重量錯覚

130 millions of speakers

크기 무게 환상

85 millions of speakers

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