Periodization for Mixed Martial Arts

Part 1 take-home message

Hlavačka P. et al. Various aspects of boxers training

114

not least, the amount of technical and tactical training is rep-

resented continually for at least 8 weeks before the peak.

In terms of the effectiveness of special training indicators

(STU) to the test in RTC1, Tab. 2, we observed statistically

sig nificant correlations with the training means TT S (sparing)

in almost all the time shifts. The positive impact of sparring

(TT S) on the test was shown during the last 8 weeks (1-4

time shift) before achieving the best test results in RTC1 (me

socycle 19 and 20, M19-M20). On the contrary, the negative

impact on the best test results were observed under low vo

lumes of sparing (TT S) with a four months’ time delay (7-8 time

shift). Furthermore, we observed the negative impact of low

training load in speed endurance training (SpdE), special

endurance (SpcE), technical and tactical load (TT) and a spe-

cial strength, dynamics and explosiveness (SS D ES) in the

accumulation period 12 to 16 weeks before the best test res ults.

Conversely, in the period from 10 to 14 weeks (time shift 5-7)

before the best test results, a high volume of training load in

general strength exercises (GS) was demonstrated positively.

The positive impact of aerobic endurance (AE) on the best test

results was shown only in 1 time shift before their achievement.

In terms of the effectiveness of special training indicators

(STU) to the test in RTC2, Tab. 3, a statistically significant cor-

relation with the training means TT (technical and tactical

training), TT S (sparing) and SS, D, ES (special strength, dy na

mics, explosiveness) was recorded when their positive effects

were demonstrated 1-2 time shifts (2-4 weeks) before the best

test results. The special endurance training load (SpcE) had a

statistically proven positive effect on the test with 2-3 time shifts

(4-6 weeks) before the best results were achieved. The statisti-

cally significant correlations were also demonstrated in the case

of speed training means (S), where a positive impact on test 1

with a time shift (2 weeks) before was shown. These statistically

proven positive adaptation effects in RTC2 are consistent with

the factual and logical evaluation of the effects of periodization

of special training means on punch endurance (PE).

The results obtained in the test are similar to those of other

authors. [10,11] measured the punch endurance test with a du

ration of 3x3min the values of about 780 ± 180 punches com-

pared to the value of about 830 ± 75 punches in our research.

Discussion

Fig. 2 shows a significant improvement after mesocycle

4. In contrast with mesocycle 1 and 2, there was an increase

in the interval training (special endurance, speed endurance),

general strength was replaced by the special strength, dyna

mics, explosiveness (circuit trainings) and technical and tacti-

cal training was added. It can be stated that this change in the

training load (the general training load of the accumulation

period was replaced by a more specialized and intensive load)

had an almost instant positive adaptation effect on punch en

durance. Mesocycle 5 was disrupted by health issues and

a subsequent complete incapacity during mesocycle 6. This

was reflected in testing at the end of this period (M6). Sub

sequently, punch endurance had an upward trend (M11). In

the period (M12 — M20), punch endurance steadily increased.

In Fig. 3 we see that the dynamics of changes in punch

endurance had a more stable development at its peak (M41-

M42), and it achieved better values than the best results in

RTC1 (M20-M21). In RTC2, the test of punch endurance ren-

dered the best values in periods with a high volume of techni-

cal and tactical training (TT) and sparring (TT S); the training

of special strength, dynamics and explosiveness (SS, D, ES)

was at higher volumes 2 -3 time shifts (4-6 weeks) before and

followed the period of general strength (GS). The special en

durance training (SpcE) was at higher volumes 2-3 time shifts

(4-6 weeks), and in the last 2-4 weeks before the peak punch

endurance, we can observe a training load of speed (speed

endurance SpdE, speed S). There were three such peaks of

punch endurance, which were preceded by a period with the

given periodization, in RTC2. Therefore, we can conclude that

the positive effect of periodization on punch endurance is

achieved in such periodization training, in which the general

strength (GS) is replaced by special strength, dynamics, ex

plo siveness (SS, D, ES) 4-6 weeks before the peak, aerobic

endurance (AE) reaches the highest volumes 6-8 weeks be

fore the peak, special endurance training reaches the highest

volumes 4-6 weeks before the peak, speed endurance train-

ing and speed training is mainly used 2-4 weeks before the

peak, speed training 1-3 weeks before the peak, and last but

Tab. 3. Pair correlations of STU and the changes in punch endurance in time shifts in RTC2

In this article you will learn about the most essential training theories that you need to know; the training effect, periodization theory. And I’m going to teach you how to use this information to periodize your training for MMA, and I truly feel that if you take this information on board you will walk away with a crystal clear picture of how your training plan should be organised.

You’ll be able to take control of your fight plan, and you’ll be supported by the latest scientific research. I’m not going to lie, this will require some heavy lifting. The concepts discussed in this article are complex.

If you’re getting frustrated working through this material on your own, consider teaming up with me in one of our online courses, and I’ll take you through the process of developing a training plan that is individually suited to you, step-by-step. Check out our wide variety of online courses here.

 If you’re a fighter or coach and you decide to pass over this material and you don’t learn the essential theories that are the foundation of MMA training and to success on fight day, I think that you will waste some time, some energy, and maybe even some money doing the wrong type of training; or worse, I’ve actually seen some fighters burn-out, or give up and quit, or get injured after following inappropriately designed training plans. 

So, if you don’t want to realize your full potential as a fighter, you don’t want to optimize your performance in the cage, or you don’t want to learn how to take control of your training plan, then just avoid learning about periodization, and don’t read this article.

So, why learn periodization theory? To succeed in MMA, you need to know what to do (i.e. endurance, resistance, agility, skill training, flexibility) and you need to know how and when to do it.

You need to know the steps to take to organize your entire fight plan. You need to know when you should train hard to ensure that you adapt and grow stronger, but you also need to know when you should have a rest day, or a rest week, to avoid overtraining and burn-out.

To know what do and when to do it, you need to understand periodization i.e. how the objectives of a training session should fit in with the objective of a training week, which fall in line with the objectives of the overall fight plan at that particular phase of training.

To understand how to organize your training, you must first understand periodization theory, which considers how you respond to a particular type of workout (training effect), and how the volume and intensity of training should change to meet your needs over your entire fight plan, and over your whole fight career (periodization theory).

You need to understand how your body responds to training, so that you can use the right training loads at the right time, and this needs to match up with your fight schedule, so that you can build yourself up to your highest level of preparedness, and peak for your fight.

This article will be divided into 5 parts.

Part 1: Periodization demystified: you learned that periodization is an art, but it’s also a science. You also learned that there are a number of ways that your performance can improve by using periodization, and I showed you what a periodized fight schedule looks like.

Part 2: How to plan and sequence your training phases: you learned all about the big phases; the general prep phase, the fight-specific phase, the fight camp, the taper, and the transition. You learned that if you arrange your training in the order we showed you to, you can avoid over-training, dissipate your fatigue, and cause a peak in your performance for your fight.

Part 3: How to plan and sequence your training sub-phases: you learned how to organize the sub-phases of the fight plan. You also learned about the key concepts of training difficulty, and loading plan. And I showed you the 4 different types of sub-phases that you can use when periodizing your fight plan: the developmental sub-phase, the shock sub-phase, the taper sub-phase, and the transition sub-phase. And I gave you a practical example of how to incorporate that information into your training plan right now.

Part 4: How to plan and sequence your training weeks: you learned all about the training weeks, you learned about the four different types; the recovery weeks, the developmental weeks, the shock weeks and the peaking weeks. And I showed you how to progress your training weeks. We also expanded on your practical example.

Part 5: How to plan a training session: you learned how to structure a training session, including the introduction, warm-up, main body and cool-down.

This is article series is going to require some heavy lifting on your part (mental, not physical), but I promise that if you can master this information, you’ll have the key to designing your optimal fight plan, and this will help you reach your full potential as a fighter.  Now, let’s get on with it.

Part 1: Periodization demystified: you learned that periodization is an art, but it’s also a science. You also learned that there are a number of ways that your performance can improve by using periodization, and I showed you what a periodized fight schedule looks like.

Part 2: How to plan and sequence your training phases: you learned all about the big phases; the general prep phase, the fight-specific phase, the fight camp, the taper, and the transition. You learned that if you arrange your training in the order we showed you to, you can avoid over-training, dissipate your fatigue, and cause a peak in your performance for your fight.

Part 3: How to plan and sequence your training sub-phases: you learned how to organize the sub-phases of the fight plan. You also learned about the key concepts of training difficulty, and loading plan. And I showed you the 4 different types of sub-phases that you can use when periodizing your fight plan: the developmental sub-phase, the shock sub-phase, the taper sub-phase, and the transition sub-phase. And I gave you a practical example of how to incorporate that information into your training plan right now.

Part 4: How to plan and sequence your training weeks: you learned all about the training weeks, you learned about the four different types; the recovery weeks, the developmental weeks, the shock weeks and the peaking weeks. And I showed you how to progress your training weeks. We also expanded on your practical example.

Part 5: How to plan a training session: you learned how to structure a training session, including the introduction, warm-up, main body and cool-down.

Periodization is perhaps the most important, yet most often neglected component of a fighters’ training plan. Periodization is the process of organizing your training plan over a period of time to help you manage your fatigue on a daily, weekly and monthly basis.

Periodization is a blend of art and science. On the artistic side, it is a subjective organizational tool that helps you divide your training into specific periods that manipulate volume and intensity, so as to minimise fatigue and overtraining, and maximise your performance at some future date (1, 2).

Periodization theories assume that your adaptation to training is predictable (i.e. how long it takes you to supercompensate; read more on your adaptation to training here). This assumption allows coaches to plan the difficulty of a fighters training well into the future (1-3).

Unfortunately this assumption is flawed. In fact, it is very difficult to predict how an individual will respond to a training plan. This is because we are all unique, and there are many factors that influence our adaptation to training, from our genetics and training history, to daily variations in our biological and psychological state.

For these reasons, it is very difficult to predict how you will respond to a given training plan. This does not mean that periodization is useless; it just means that there is no single, pre-determined periodized training structure that you should be following, because you are unique.

For this reason, coaches and fighters in mixed martial arts (MMA) should feel free to develop creative training approaches based on their own knowledge and experience, incorporating Science whenever possible.

This is where the MMA Training Bible comes in; our goal is to provide you with the knowledge to take control of your training plan, and teach you how to run the experiments on yourself that will optimise your performance on fight day.

Понравилась статья? Поделиться с друзьями:
Website Name