Hoodia Side Effects, Uses, Claims, and More

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Medical Disclaimer

More about hoodia

Related treatment guides

How does Hoodia work?

Hoodia gordonii is a cactus-like succulent plant, native to the Kalahari Desert in southern Africa.1 Due to over harvest and slow growth, Hoodia is now considered an endangered species. Hoodia grows in clumps of upright stems with tan flowers and thorns, and a strong, unpleasant odor.

Hoodia has received publicity in recent times for its natural appetite suppressant properties.

Patients should not take Hoodia without first talking to their doctor if they

  • have diabetes or are taking a medicine to control blood sugar levels,
  • have any heart problems or take any heart medicines,
  • have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder or are taking a medicine to increase or decrease the clotting of their blood such as aspirin, warfarin (Coumadin), or heparin,
  • have anorexia, bulimia or any other eating disorder.

Patients may not be able to take Hoodia, or may require special monitoring during treatment if they have any of the conditions or are taking any of the medicines listed above.

Hoodia has not been evaluated by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, or purity. All potential risks and/ or advantages of Hoodia may not be known. Additionally, there are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for these compounds.

There have been instances where herbal/ health supplements have been sold which were contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/ health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Hoodia is available for purchase in retail stores and online; however, clinical trials have not proven Hoodia effectiveness or safety. Actual amounts of hoodia in advertised products cannot always be confirmed, and products may be counterfeit or contaminated.

In October, 2011 the FDA notified consumers that the “P57 Hoodia” product marketed by Huikng Pharmaceutical was found to contain sibutramine, a controlled substance that was removed from the U.S.

market in October 2010 for safety reasons. Sibutramine may substantially increase blood pressure and/or pulse rate in some patients and may present a significant risk for patients with a history of coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, or stroke.

The appetite suppressant effects of Hoodia were first observed in 1937 by a Dutch anthropologist studying the primitive San Bushmen of the Kalahari Desert.

It was noticed that the nomadic Bushmen, (who call it Xhoba) ate the stem of the Hoodia plant to stave off hunger during long hunting trips in the sparsely vegetated area.

The active ingredient in Hoodia is the appetite-suppressing molecule, P57, or oxypregnane steroidal glycoside P57AS3.3 In scarce clinical studies, P57 has been researched to evaluate its potential as an anti-obesity drug.

It is theorized that P57 acts on the brain in a manner similar to glucose. It tricks the brain into thinking one is full even when they have not eaten, reduces interest in food and delays the time before hunger sets in. It appears to work at the level of the hypothalamus to inhibit hunger signals.

Patients should not take Hoodia without first talking to their doctor if they have

  • diabetes,
  • heart disease or high blood pressure,
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder,
  • anorexia, bulimia or any other eating disorder.

Patients should talk to their doctor before taking Hoodia if they have any other medical conditions, allergies (especially to plants), or if they take other medicines or herbal/ health supplements.

Patients should not take Hoodia without first talking to their doctor if they are pregnant or could become pregnant.

Patients should not take Hoodia without first talking to their doctor if they are breast-feeding.

There is no information available regarding the use of Hoodia by children. Do not give any herbal/ health supplement to a child without first talking to the child’s doctor.

The use of Hoodia in cultural and traditional settings may differ from concepts accepted by current Western medicine. When considering the use of herbal supplements, consultation with a primary health care professional is advisable.

Additionally, consultation with a practitioner trained in the uses of herbal/ health supplements may be beneficial, and coordination of treatment among all health care providers involved may be advantageous.

Take Hoodia only as directed by a doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider.

Store Hoodia as directed on the package.

There is limited drug interaction information available between Hoodia and other medicines. It is recommended that patients talk to their doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines or other herbal/ health supplements.

An in-vitro clinical trial has shown that intestinal transport of P57 was mediated by P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance proteins MRP1/MRP2. P57 exhibited weak inhibition of the liver cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme.3 The potential for clinically significant drug interactions is unknown.

Published, peer-reviewed, randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of Hoodia gordonii are lacking.

A 15-day, randomized clinical trial published in 2011 evaluated Hoodia gordonii purified extract (HgPE) relative to placebo. Healthy, overweight women (n=64) received 1,110 milligram HgPE or placebo formulated in a yogurt drink one hour before breakfast and dinner.

Menus otherwise were unchanged and portions were not controlled. HgPE was less well-tolerated than placebo due to episodes of nausea, vomiting, and skin sensations. Blood pressure, pulse, heart rate, bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase were significantly increased in the HgPE group. No significant effects on energy intakes or weight relative to placebo were demonstrated.

References

  1. van Heerden FR. Hoodia gordonii: a natural appetite suppressant. J Ethnopharmacol 2008:119;434-7.
  2. Madgula VL. Avula B. Pawar RS, et al. In vitro metabolic stability and intestinal transport of P57AS3 (P57) from Hoodia gordonii and its interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. Planta Med 2008:74:1269-75.
  3. Blom WA. Abrahamse SL. Bradford R, et al. Effects of 15-d repeated consumption of Hoodia gordonii purified extract on safety, ad libitum energy intake, and body weight in healthly, overweight women: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011:94;1171-81; Clinical trial available at http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01306422?term=hoodia{amp}amp;rank=1 Accessed 04/11/2018.

Copyright 1996-2019. Version: 2.01.

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) — A new Unilever report reveals why the consumer goods giant chose to pull the plug on the alleged fat-fighting supplement Hoodia after spending a reported $25 million developing it.

In a clinical trial, it turns out that Hoodia extract had no impact on appetite or food intake, but did have a lot of side effects, like vomiting, weird skin sensations and elevated blood pressure and heart rate.

While Unilever has known this since 2008, the news is bound to disappoint consumers, who can buy Hoodia for less than $20 on the Internet.

One website, for instance, claims that Hoodia “will curb your appetite almost immediately, after taking only a few milligrams,” and “will not make your heart race.”

G. Harvey Anderson, a professor of nutrition at the University of Toronto, applauded the new report in an email to Reuters Health.

“This is a valuable study showing that the hype around Hoodia and its advertising in products claiming to contain it for weight loss belongs in the ‘too good to be true category,’” said Anderson, who was not involved in the Unilever study.

Things did start out great for the herbal extract, which comes from the succulent plant Hoodia gordonii and has purportedly been used for millennia by Bushmen in the Kalahari trying to ward off hunger on long hunting trips.

Lab tests showed it made rats eat less, and an unpublished study suggested the same was true for humans, according to the new report.

The plant’s supposedly active ingredient was isolated by South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), which told Reuters in 2001 that Kalahari’s Khomani people stood to get royalties from the Hoodia sales.

CSIR signed over the commercial drug rights to British biotechnology firm Phytopharm Plc in 1997. Phytopharm then struck a deal with the U.S.-based drugmaker Pfizer to develop a weight loss drug based on Hoodia, but that never panned out. So Unilever picked up.

But in 2008, the London- and Rotterdam-based company suddenly canned the project, telling Bloomberg News that Hoodia didn’t meet safety and efficacy standards.

The report, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, shows that’s putting it politely.

In their trial, Unilever researchers randomly assigned 49 healthy, overweight women to one of two groups. Both groups stayed at a clinic and were given two servings of yogurt a day for 15 days. In one group’s yogurt drinks, the researchers had mixed in 1,110 milligrams of Hoodia.

The women were allowed to eat as much as they wanted during their stay at the clinic, yet there was no difference in calorie intake or weight loss between the two groups. Along the same lines, Hoodia didn’t stifle anyone’s hunger.

However, the Hoodia-treated women didn’t fare as well as the placebo group. They experienced 208 cases of side effects — three times the number reported by women eating normal yogurt — including headaches, nausea, vomiting and odd skin sensations.

They showed increases in pulse and blood pressure, and signs of liver damage.

“There are many commercially available dietary supplements that claim to contain H. gordonii,” Unilever’s Wendy Blom and colleagues write in the report.

“Given the results here, we cannot exclude the possibility that consumers who take certain of these supplements could experience similar side effects.”

The Hoodia-based medication no longer in development is just one example of a long series of failed diet pills. Earlier this year, for example, U.S. health regulators rejected Orexigen Therapeutics’ drug Contrave, which many had predicted would be the first new diet pill in a decade.

Unilever did not respond to requests for comment. Anderson, however, was happy to see the results in print.

“The company should be congratulated for conducting the study and the journal for publishing it,” he said. “Publication of negative and not just positive results needs to be encouraged.”

But Kalahari’s tribesmen probably won’t be pleased to know their promised riches were nothing but a mirage.

SOURCE: bit.ly/pcPQ9d American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, online October 12, 2011.

There are plenty of hoodia scams out there, so it’s wise to use the following guidelines when making a purchase:

1. Real hoodia comes only from South Africa, so don’t purchase anything that states it was grown elsewhere.

2. Before making a purchase, request a lab analysis certificate from the company. If they are legitimate, they won’t view this as a challenging or odd request.

3. Companies that purchase hoodia from South Africa also receive a CITES certificate from the South African government to validate the product. CITES is an international agreement designed to regulate trade of plants and animals between countries. Legitimate online companies will typically display the certificate on their website. If the certificate is not displayed, there is no proof that you are actually buying hoodia from South Africa. This certificate alone doesn’t cover what happens to the hoodia once a company purchases it. In combination with the lab analysis certificate, it is solid validation for the consumer.

4. Check the product ingredients to see if the aerial stem is listed because this is the part of the succulent that suppresses appetite.

5. Avoid any hoodia products that aren’t completely natural or include stimulants.

6. Buy only hoodia gordonii products. There are at least twenty other species of hoodia that are not effective as a weight loss product.

7. Avoid purchasing hoodia in sprays or patches. The most effective product forms are pill, liquid and powder.

So you’ve heard about Hoodia Gordonii and its natural ability to suppress your appetite for up to six hours with no side effects. But how much do you need to take to really lose weight? In order to lose weight effectively, most physicians recommend that dieters take 500 mg of pure Hoodia Gordonii per day.

That being said, you will need to make sure that the dosage you are getting is accurately depicted. Nearly 80 percent of Hoodia Gordonii suppliers dilute or even counterfeit their products to make a quick buck. At RadioHealth.net, we have compiled a well researched list of reputable suppliers who offer only 100 percent pure Hoodia Gordonii. Each product is completely certified and authenticated, guaranteed to be the real thing or your money back.

How Much Hoodia Gordonii Do You Need to Lose Weight Permanently?
There is certainly a difference between short-term weight loss (as the result of a dramatic diet, a fast, an illness, etc.) and long-term, permanent weight loss that results from a lifestyle change. While there are dosages ranging from 400 mg to 750 mg, there are no significant studies to indicate how the 750 mg pill would make much of a difference in your appetite suppression.

To find out more about how much of the supplement you need to take, just email us at info@radiohealth.net. We can point you in the direction of Hoodia Gordonii products that really do help people lose weight. We can show you how to structure your intake for maximum results. Many experts do believe that permanent weight loss can be achieved through the use of this supplement with the addition of exercise and healthy eating.

What happens if I overdose?

No information is available regarding a missed dose of Hoodia. Consult with a doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider if additional information is required.

Seek emergency medical attention.

There are no known restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while taking Hoodia, unless otherwise directed by a health care provider.

Patients should talk to their doctor about any side effects they may develop.

References

  1. van Heerden FR. Hoodia gordonii: a natural appetite suppressant. J Ethnopharmacol 2008:119;434-7.
  2. Madgula VL. Avula B. Pawar RS, et al. In vitro metabolic stability and intestinal transport of P57AS3 (P57) from Hoodia gordonii and its interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. Planta Med 2008:74:1269-75.
  3. Blom WA. Abrahamse SL. Bradford R, et al. Effects of 15-d repeated consumption of Hoodia gordonii purified extract on safety, ad libitum energy intake, and body weight in healthly, overweight women: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011:94;1171-81; Clinical trial available at http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01306422?term=hoodia{amp}amp;rank=1 Accessed 04/11/2018.

Sources

SOURCES: Mark Blumenthal, president, American Botanical Council, Austin,
Texas. David MacLean, MD, adjunct associate professor, Brown University,
Providence, R.I.; Pfizer researcher. MacLean, D. Brain Research, Sept.
10, 2004; vol 1020: pp 1-11. Richard M.

Goldfarb, MD, medical director, Bucks
County Clinical Research, Morrisville, Pa. Michael McGuffin, president,
American Herbal Products Association. Michael Steelman, MD, chairman of the
board of trustees, American Society of Bariatric Physicians;

Понравилась статья? Поделиться с друзьями:
Website Name