How to ‘Run It Like a Girl’

“Kumbaya Circles”

Today the company works with hundreds of clients; among the big names are Toyota, Capital One, Dove, Yahoo, Chevrolet and Green Giant.

By offering young people a strong sense of belonging, plus recognizing and rewarding them for their unique talents, the founders say they cultivate innovation, creativity and productivity. This result is verified on the global level in the latest study by Catalyst, the leading research organization on women at work.

When employees feel a sense of inclusion, they take more risks, make more innovative suggestions and become better team citizens. These findings held true in China, Germany, Mexico and Australia, as well as in the U.S.

As the Clever Girls Collective enters its seventh year as a prospering company, the 30 employees meet once a month to renew tribal bonds, celebrate, critique their progress and collaborate on future goals.

Gathering in a rented Airbnb space for the day, most team members are 20-something white women, although some are Latina and Asian. They hold degrees in communications, advertising, business management and even art history, but they have learned to be facile in using social media tools.

There are other men on the team besides Schneider, including a “new Clever” introduced on this day. He’s Eric Rodriguez, husband of Vice President of Client Services Edita Rodriguez. After seeing how happy she has been in four years with a company “run like a girl,” he wanted some of what she has.

Pomponi’s boyfriend, Adam Juratovac, is also on staff, serving as network manager for a new athlete influencer group. He prefers this environment: “It’s a lot more friendly and open than male-dominated companies where you have to watch your back every time they bring in a new guy who wants to steal your job.

The highlight of Culture Day is the emotion-releasing sessions in which Lincoln announces weddings, births, anniversaries, birthdays and promotions. Everyone applauds. But it’s when each staffer reads a shout-out to anyone on her team who helped her through a crisis or offered a solution that eyes tear up and hugs happen. These written notes are treasured recognitions.

Lincoln winds up the day with a progress report, including the news that the company hit $1.5 million in the second quarter of 2015. “By August, we are tracking to more than double our gross bookings by the end of this year, $6 million.” Cheers and finger snaps. “That’s a very exciting milestone!”

Eager to enjoy a celebratory dinner with her husband, her co-founders and their partners, who were also planning a trip to Mexico together, Lincoln pauses to reflect on this extended family. “This Culture Day gives me chills because a lot of our employees are young.

Never underestimate the staying power of women whose DNA is coded for progress. Read more about how women are changing workplace culture.

This article appears in theJanuary 2016 issue of SUCCESS Magazine.

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10 Ways to Build Social Media Expertise Using Personal Web Projects

When Timex sponsored a Twitter party in late 2009, it leaned on the social media expertise of Stefania Pomponi Butler and her partners in Clever Girls Collective to deliver a conversation that would engage women consumers with the Timex brand.

But Stefania’s social media smarts weren’t born from a corporate campaign or formal training: this former marketing pro got her start in social media by blogging about life as an urban mom. The success of her personal blog brought forth paid blogging gigs, which turned into editing gigs and then production gigs. Eventually, she had enough experience to start her own company connecting big brands to online influencers. A personal web project turned into full-fledged social media career.

Many social media experts and professionals started their current careers like Stefania did, with a personal web site or project. As I reflected this week on a recent personal project that had me testing out new WordPress plugins, Twitter tools and Excel macros, I was reminded of how valuable personal projects are in building social media expertise.

If you’re involved in social media efforts within your company, are trying to carve out a niche as a social media pro, or just want to understand what this new space is all about, personal web projects are crucial to honing your skills. Here are some tips for making your personal web efforts an effective part of your ongoing professional development:

Keep it personal. Choose a subject or focus that is completely (and I mean completely) unrelated to your work. That could mean creating a collection of nature photos on Flickr, a blog about local restaurants, or a Twitter roundup of the latest beauty products — unless you work for an ecological organization, a food distributor or, say, Revlon. It’s great to have passions that intersect with your professional life, but if you do a social media project that is even vaguely related to your job, your employer (or their customers) may hold you accountable for the results. And that’s not a safe sandbox to play in.

Be cautious. Personal doesn’t mean intimate. If you’re thinking about a project that involves your family, think carefully about the safety implications and especially before posting your kids’ photos online. Until you are really fluent in social media, err on the side of caution by keeping private your family stories private or at least anonymous.

Start simple. Create your social media project on a fully hosted service so that you don’t have to sort out the complexities of setting up your own site. WordPress.com , Flickr and Twitter are all good starting options.

Give yourself room to grow. Choose a platform that will let you extend your project in new ways and try out new tools. Get going with Flickr or Twitter, and you can explore a world of tools and applications that complement those services. If you start with a WordPress blog, you can move your blog onto a web host that gives you more control over your blog’s set up.

Give yourself a budget. While you can do lots of great stuff for free online, you’ll have more possibilities — and perhaps more fun — if you give yourself a modest budget. You might want to spend ten or twenty dollars a month buying stock images to illustrate your blog; pay for a service that gives you more information about your Twittering efforts; or upgrade your blog to a custom URL.

Go easy on yourself. The social web can be a great place to get support or enforce your commitment to a personal goal like losing weight, building your own log cabin or reading all of Proust. But if you focus on a challenge that is already daunting, you’re less likely to stick with it. You’ll find most of your energy is focused on sticking to your resolve, rather than exploring and learning.

Be a night owl (or an early bird). You’ll learn the most from your social media experiment if you’re prepared to make a few mistakes — installing widgets that don’t work right, making design changes that look terrible, embedding multimedia content that doesn’t display. It’s a lot less scary to make those mistakes early in the morning or late at night, when fewer people are likely to be visiting your site.

Find a community. Explore the sites and web presences of other hobbyists (or experts) in your space to see what they are talking about and what online tools they use. Introduce yourself and comment on their photos, videos or posts — and encourage them to take a look at what you’re up to, too.

Balance tech with content

Some people use their personal web projects as a chance to geek out and try specialized tools and software, and upgrade their tech knowledge. Others focus on the content — shooting the perfect video, writing the world’s most articulate blog post, snapping the greatest high-speed photos. But you’ll learn the most if you divide your attention between content and technology, and develop both your creative and technical skills.

Be prepared to own your project.

Even if you’ve created a totally anonymous personal project, assume that sooner or later you could be unmasked. Make sure that whatever you post online, you’re prepared to live up to it at Monday’s staff meeting.

Follow these guidelines and your personal web projects will become an effective and ongoing part of your professional development. Who knows? It may even become your full-time gig.

Alexandra Samuel is the Director of the Social Interactive Media Centre at Emily Carr University, and the co-founder of Social Signal, a Vancouver-based social media agency. You can follow Alex on Twitter as awsamuel or her blog at alexandrasamuel.com.

Selling the Human Part

Measuring influencer marketing is complex, even without misleading industry jargon (that some “partners” don’t expect you to understand). As the founder of an influencer marketing agency and someone who’s worked in the space for 15 years, I’ve seen how measurement buzzwords confuse clients. Clients have different KPIs, and agencies offer different measurement options. What does all this mean?

Here we reveal the truth about measurement at three levels of the purchase funnel: awareness, interest and action.

Phase 1: Awareness

“Potential Impressions”

What it sounds like: The number of eyeballs likely to see content — for example, we have the potential to reach these impressions.

What it really means: The maximum number of times content could be viewed{amp}amp;nbsp;if every possible eyeball sees it; the aggregate reach of each influencer on each channel, multiplied by the number of times content is posted on that channel. For example, if an influencer with 25,000 Instagram followers posts three times, that’s 75,000 potential impressions. If they also post once on Facebook, where they have 100,000 followers, that would total 175,000 potential impressions.

Potential impressions are a great way to compare how far-reaching one program will be versus another.

“Actual Impressions”

What it sounds like: The number of people who have actually viewed influencer posts

What it really means: The estimated number of people who view a post,{amp}amp;nbsp;as determined by a vendor-selected percentage of potential impressions on each channel. For example, a social media platform or agency may estimate that 5% of potential audiences will actually see Instagram content, while another will estimate 65%. Dashboards often present «actual impressions» data without disclosing formulas{amp}amp;nbsp;or making apparent that it’s an estimated number.

This metric may be useful as a point of comparison across programs, but only if you set consistent “actual impression” formulas for each channel. Vendor formulas aren’t necessarily consistent with social media algorithms or each other.

“Views”

What it sounds like: How many people see influencer content

What it really means: A “view” is defined differently across channels. Blog post views are measured when a page loads, while Twitter’s video views record whether a video plays for two seconds or more with 50% of it on screen.

View data is only available to brands on a few channels or through influencer self-reporting across social. So, brands should only consider measuring views for videos or small programs with few influencers.

“Reach”

What it sounds like: The number of eyeballs that see content

What it really means: The aggregate number of followers each influencer has across all relevant channels. Unlike potential impressions, reach doesn’t take into account how many times influencers will post on each channel.

This is an important metric to track because reach helps you understand the audience size of each influencer. It’s even more important to focus on who they’re reaching to ensure their audiences include your targets.

Phase 2: Interest

“Engagement”

What it sounds like: An indication that an audience has interacted with content

What it really means: Any interaction with your influencer’s content: likes, comments, retweets, etc. Some marketers define engagement narrowly (e.g., counting only click-throughs). Engagement metrics are meant to be broad, especially since channels change the definition of “engagement” regularly.

Pay attention to all engagements. Track where and how people engage — a retweet with the comment “I love this!” can mean more than a click-through.

“Engagement Rate”

What it sounds like: The level of engagement influencers have with their audiences

What it really means: The average engagements per post, divided by the number of followers on that channel. This doesn’t tell you how trusted an influencer is, the authenticity of their engagement or how content will perform.

Influencer marketers should use this metric with caution. There’s no single way to measure influencer credibility. Platforms that flash engagement rates are attempting to quantify and automate influencer authenticity. However, selecting influencers based on engagement rate (or paying per engagement) encourages spam and inauthentic behavior. This can lead to Instagram Pods, click-for-comment and purchased likes.

Also, this metric doesn’t tell you what an audience engages with. Engagement rates on makeup posts, for example, won’t have much to do with performances of a sponsored post on pets.

Phase 3: Action

Earned Media Value (EMV)

What it sounds like: A way to calculate the value of what you got for what you paid (an ROI metric).

What it really means: An inconsistent formula that assigns an arbitrary dollar value to different types of interactions. For example, a retweet could be valued at $1, and a like could be valued at $2. Or they could each be valued at $10, at the discretion of the vendor.

Earned media value shouldn’t be used to show sales impact. But if you set your own formula, EMV can be helpful for comparisons. Use EMV to give metrics different weights, and compare total results across programs. For example, if your brand values Instagram likes more than likes from Facebook, you can assign a higher dollar value to that action and compare totals. However, never treat earned media value as an accurate dollar return{amp}amp;nbsp;or an apples-to-apples measurement across vendors. The calculation is different for every shop.

“ROI”

What it sounds like: The return on your influencer marketing investment

What it really means: ROI almost always refers to the calculated total media value (earned media value plus paid media value) divided by the cost of your program.

This metric shouldn’t be considered an accurate representation of your return on sales unless it incorporates sales data. The true return of your influencer marketing investment can be calculated through an ROI study, incorporating the lift in sales, online conversation and brand credibility.

Always ask your influencer marketing partner for the definitions of what they’re measuring and why those metrics are important. With hundreds of ways to activate influencers to support brand objectives, you should define what success looks like for you and work with a partner you trust to measure it.

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Measuring influencer marketing is complex, even without misleading industry jargon (that some “partners” don’t expect you to understand). As the founder of an influencer marketing agency and someone who’s worked in the space for 15 years, I’ve seen how measurement buzzwords confuse clients. Clients have different KPIs, and agencies offer different measurement options. What does all this mean?

Here we reveal the truth about measurement at three levels of the purchase funnel: awareness, interest and action.

Phase 1: Awareness

“Potential Impressions”

What it sounds like: The number of eyeballs likely to see content — for example, we have the potential to reach these impressions.

What it really means: The maximum number of times content could be viewed if every possible eyeball sees it; the aggregate reach of each influencer on each channel, multiplied by the number of times content is posted on that channel. For example, if an influencer with 25,000 Instagram followers posts three times, that’s 75,000 potential impressions. If they also post once on Facebook, where they have 100,000 followers, that would total 175,000 potential impressions.

Potential impressions are a great way to compare how far-reaching one program will be versus another.

“Actual Impressions”

What it sounds like: The number of people who have actually viewed influencer posts

What it really means: The estimated number of people who view a post, as determined by a vendor-selected percentage of potential impressions on each channel. For example, a social media platform or agency may estimate that 5% of potential audiences will actually see Instagram content, while another will estimate 65%. Dashboards often present «actual impressions» data without disclosing formulas or making apparent that it’s an estimated number.

This metric may be useful as a point of comparison across programs, but only if you set consistent “actual impression” formulas for each channel. Vendor formulas aren’t necessarily consistent with social media algorithms or each other.

“Views”

What it sounds like: How many people see influencer content

What it really means: A “view” is defined differently across channels. Blog post views are measured when a page loads, while Twitter’s video views record whether a video plays for two seconds or more with 50% of it on screen.

View data is only available to brands on a few channels or through influencer self-reporting across social. So, brands should only consider measuring views for videos or small programs with few influencers.

“Reach”

What it sounds like: The number of eyeballs that see content

What it really means: The aggregate number of followers each influencer has across all relevant channels. Unlike potential impressions, reach doesn’t take into account how many times influencers will post on each channel.

This is an important metric to track because reach helps you understand the audience size of each influencer. It’s even more important to focus on who they’re reaching to ensure their audiences include your targets.

Phase 2: Interest

“Engagement”

What it sounds like: An indication that an audience has interacted with content

What it really means: Any interaction with your influencer’s content: likes, comments, retweets, etc. Some marketers define engagement narrowly (e.g., counting only click-throughs). Engagement metrics are meant to be broad, especially since channels change the definition of “engagement” regularly.

Pay attention to all engagements. Track where and how people engage — a retweet with the comment “I love this!” can mean more than a click-through.

“Engagement Rate”

What it sounds like: The level of engagement influencers have with their audiences

What it really means: The average engagements per post, divided by the number of followers on that channel. This doesn’t tell you how trusted an influencer is, the authenticity of their engagement or how content will perform.

Influencer marketers should use this metric with caution. There’s no single way to measure influencer credibility. Platforms that flash engagement rates are attempting to quantify and automate influencer authenticity. However, selecting influencers based on engagement rate (or paying per engagement) encourages spam and inauthentic behavior. This can lead to Instagram Pods, click-for-comment and purchased likes.

Also, this metric doesn’t tell you what an audience engages with. Engagement rates on makeup posts, for example, won’t have much to do with performances of a sponsored post on pets.

Phase 3: Action

Earned Media Value (EMV)

What it sounds like: A way to calculate the value of what you got for what you paid (an ROI metric).

What it really means: An inconsistent formula that assigns an arbitrary dollar value to different types of interactions. For example, a retweet could be valued at $1, and a like could be valued at $2. Or they could each be valued at $10, at the discretion of the vendor.

Earned media value shouldn’t be used to show sales impact. But if you set your own formula, EMV can be helpful for comparisons. Use EMV to give metrics different weights, and compare total results across programs. For example, if your brand values Instagram likes more than likes from Facebook, you can assign a higher dollar value to that action and compare totals. However, never treat earned media value as an accurate dollar return or an apples-to-apples measurement across vendors. The calculation is different for every shop.

“ROI”

What it sounds like: The return on your influencer marketing investment

What it really means: ROI almost always refers to the calculated total media value (earned media value plus paid media value) divided by the cost of your program.

This metric shouldn’t be considered an accurate representation of your return on sales unless it incorporates sales data. The true return of your influencer marketing investment can be calculated through an ROI study, incorporating the lift in sales, online conversation and brand credibility.

Always ask your influencer marketing partner for the definitions of what they’re measuring and why those metrics are important. With hundreds of ways to activate influencers to support brand objectives, you should define what success looks like for you and work with a partner you trust to measure it.

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Making changes is difficult. They challenge you, they push you and they make you uncomfortable. We often know what it takes to make ourselves feel better, to take it to the next level, but it can take a few “rock bottom” moments for us to actually take the steps in the right direction. 

Stefania Pomponi, a loyal Palo Alto uforia client since the beginning, can attest to those “rock bottom” moments that doubled as fuel to the journey of her best self. After a difficult and shattering divorce she decided that it was time to make herself, her health, and most importantly feeling great a priority. That’s when she stumbled across uforia, lost 35 pounds and got into the best mental and physical shape of her life– ALL in her 40’s. Read her story below to see the secret to her successes and find out her “secret” uforia formula. #inspo

Six years ago, at 42, I went through a difficult separation and that ultimately led to divorce. I had spent so much of my life, my time, being extremely unhappy and not living the life I had imagined for myself. I decided it was time to take my life back. The first step in owning my worth was to recommit to fitness and health. I had always been active. I was a lifelong dancer, but in the last years of my marriage, I lost myself and the things that had brought me joy. In the beginning of this new commitment, I started running. I would find myself struggling up the hills at the Stanford Dish, but each time growing stronger and more empowered when I got to the top. I started HIIT workouts using a variety of apps to tone my muscles and bring them back to life. I took an empowering weekly burlesque class in San Francisco. The best part about the beginning of my journey was that I had learned to love my body again–no matter my age or size. That’s when I decided that I needed to start dancing again.

Five years ago, I started to look for Hip-Hop classes; they were what I loved when I was younger, they had diversity. Every class I stepped into had dancers of all ethnic and racial backgrounds. What really resonated with me however, was that they had different body types. This embracing of differences helped me feel the most free I had ever felt; feelings I didn’t experience after years of technical and uniformed ballet. I started researching studios in my area and decided to try the one closest to my house: Uforia. At that time, the hip hop classes that are popular today weren’t on the regular class schedule. I was lucky enough to take a few of these “early” Hip-Hop classes, but after a few months the instructor left. I took the initiative and e-mailed Sarah (uforia’s CEO) and said, “if hip hop became a regular offering, I would be there.” Well, several months later, a team of teachers were added to the schedule. From there I became a regular Uforian and never looked back.

I don’t know what I would do without Uforia. Post-divorce, it gave me my life back. I have always felt clients of any age are welcome. Through any challenge–no matter what I look like or feel like–I feel encouraged and supported. I want everyone to know that even if you are 48, you never have to stop doing what you love. In hip hop, I shake my booty harder and flip my hair more than I ever did when I was 15, because now I really know what it’s like to feel free! There is always time to live the life you want—don’t wait. And, finally, everyone deserves to be happy. I have made friends at Uforia who are like sisters to me. GRIT and Rev Rockstars have literally transformed by body. The dance Rockstars give me a place to express myself and be uninhibited. For all of this, I am deeply grateful, and I know the true meaning of #uforialove.

SO, what are Stefania’s secrets? Read below to find out!

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I love a double workout! My favorite it the GRIT Rev combo. Fellow Uforian Amanda Sibley told me at the beginning of 2017 that that particular combo completely transformed her body. I started doing back to back classes soon after and I credit that combo with doing the same for mine. Cardio is great, but women, especially, need to lift weights for a variety of reasons. Like most women over 40, I can’t lose weight (anymore) just by doing cardio. Weights (as in GRIT) are the key to burning fat and building muscle. That’s the #1 reason why I push myself to lift the heaviest weights I can in GRIT and then give myself a break with 3 lb. weights in Rev. (BTW, Amanda will KILL YOU with 3 lb weights in Rev. Her arm segment is SO hard!)

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Here’s my breakdown of the classes I take, come join me in Palo Alto:

Monday: AM GRIT with Ryan/PM Rev with Amanda

Tuesday: AM GRIT with Caityn/Hip-hop with Jazon

Wednesday: AM GRIT with Ryan/Rev with Shane Y.

Thursday: AM GRIT with Caitlyn/either Hip hop or Rev (whatever I’m feeling)

Friday: AM GRIT with Ryan/Hip hop with Devi

Saturday Double Day: GRIT with Ryan/Hip hop with Devi

Sunday Double Day: GRIT with Drea/Hip hop with Walker or Olivia


Are you inspired by Stefania’s story like we are? She is #uforiainspo!

Within their first month, the two founders signed contracts with 100 writers with popular online communities. Most were young mothers eager to work from home for $50 to $500, depending on the campaign.

“We tried for 10 minutes to be a tech company,” Pomponi recalls. “Our first hire was a young tech dude who brought in two others just like him—all guys, lots of energy—and they insisted we needed to build a platform to run our agency.

“But if brands want to connect with people, why would you let an algorithm do that for you?” argued Kristy Sammis, a friend of the founders. Sammis had designed dazzling events for BlogHer, a pioneering network of blogs written mostly by women.

Pomponi asked Sammis to consider working with Clever Girls. The effervescent woman had recently given birth to her first child at 35 and moved with her husband to Napa Valley, expecting to devote herself to being a mom.

But Sammis admitted she was beginning to feel isolated. Exhilarated by the idea of Clever Girls, she strapped her 7-month-old into the backseat of her Subaru and drove to San Francisco to meet with the two entrepreneurs.

The three women hit it off. All believers in the value of emotional intelligence, they laughingly admit to having compared their astrological signs, which boded well for compatibility. No one would be the boss.

They would be a leadership roundtable. Using cellphones, Skype, Google Docs and Dropbox, they could be in more or less constant collaboration while continuing to operate the complex machinery of family life.

They tried to get meetings with venture capitalists, but were dismissed despite having major clients and revenue. “This isn’t a business that will scale; it’s a lifestyle business, a lady business,” one VC told them.

When they talked with bank officers about getting a loan, “We were ‘cupcaked,’ ” Lincoln says. “Basically they patted us on the head and said, ‘You should be so proud of starting your own little business.’ ”

The founders realized they were indeed a lifestyle business, and that was good thing. Women have always communicated and influenced one another’s purchases. Social media simply creates a larger amphitheater for those discussions, and it turns out to be far more influential than ads. Their new business model would be “automated where possible, human where it counts.”

“But how did you get through that first year in business?” I asked, incredulous to learn that Pomponi had a baby and Sammis was still nursing. They laughed. “It’s an organic system,” Lincoln says. “You expand, you contract, and you work a little later.”

With no hierarchy or rigid workday hours, it was vital to hire people who could be trusted to pull their loads and had values in sync with the founders’. Once on board, newbies were asked to take the Myers-Briggs and StrengthsFinder assessments to learn their personality types and leadership styles.

The founders bootstrapped their countercultural concept with investments by friends, family and a couple of prominent clients. By their third year, they became a “C” corporation with revenues of $204,000, and by the fifth year, revenues were nearly $3 million.

Their “winningest” campaign was pro bono, partnering with the local Make-A-Wish chapter to turn San Francisco into Gotham for Miles Scott, then 5 years old. He had been fighting leukemia for years. (It’s now in remission.)

Miles made a wish to be a superhero: Batman. Clever Girls volunteered to design a large-scale social media program to help. Clever Girls helped #BatKid go viral, and at its peak, the Make-A-Wish servers crashed and Wish.

org tallied about 1,000 hits per second. On the morning of the event, after multiple news stations ran broadcasts, #BatKid was trending No. 1 in the world. Even President Obama jumped on with a message.

Thanks largely to Clever Girls, #BatKid ultimately earned almost 2 billion impressions across all social media channels combined. The campaign garnered Clever Girls multiple prestigious awards, which spread awareness and attracted many new clients.

Culture of Trust

Reflecting on Clever Girls’ evolution, I ask what took the greatest personal courage in building the company. Lincoln remembers a pivotal moment in 2013 when the founders were discussing their culture code.

Pomponi stopped them. “These are lofty words, but are we, ourselves, walking the walk?”

It was natural for the founders to be open and trusting with one another. They had a history of friendship. “But with our staff, how often are we still operating from our old corporate learned reactions?” Lincoln challenged herself and her partners. “That was a scary proposition.”

Why did they need annual performance reviews anyway? It wasn’t a legal requirement. If they wanted a truly collaborative environment, shouldn’t they encourage their managers to ask their employees how they’re doing day to day?

That was the turning point.

After a call one morning the founders were giddy over agreeing to give a raise and promotion to a young hire who had hit the ball out of the park that month. They went further. Rules for private time off were eliminated.

If an employee has to take a kid to the doctor or just needs an hour and a half to get her hair done, no one questions it—as long as the work gets done in time for the client’s deadline. The staff responded to this greater flexibility by being super-responsible.

“We all live for our Google group-share calendar,” Lincoln says. “With our emails and calendars connected, we’re aware of when each member of a team is available. This encourages everyone to check email first thing in the morning and to send instant messages before taking the kids to school.”

The key to all these trust-based policies is to hire only competitive A-players. But they are forewarned not to compete with one another. They vie as teams, competing to produce the best results for the company, which also rewards them with bonuses. It sounded too good to be true.

I had to ask, “Doesn’t anyone get fired?”

“Sure,” Lincoln says. “If they don’t fit with our culture code, they’re terminated. We don’t drag it out.”

She disabuses anyone who thinks the company is a pushover. For instance, if prospective clients say they can’t give Clever Girls the same discount they would for a large company known to be all male-led, Lincoln has no hesitation about insisting on the same terms. As she likes to say, “We’re not lambs. We’re WOLVES!”

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