Madison Madness London, Ohio Fair Pulls in Four Subregional Classes — EventPR

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The rumble of the engines, the belching black smoke and the undeniable power of pulling competitions make them a staple of many fairs and events through the summer and fall months. Diesel fuel powers the machines but it is the spirit of competition that fuels the events, said Joe Singer, president of the Darke County Tractor Pullers Association.

“It’s like a drug. Once you get that in your system to be a competitor, you are going to do it — ‘black smoke ‘til I’m broke.’ It’s an addiction, within reason. I’m not saying that it is bad, but you can get hooked on it. When I pulled a little, we took four antique and farm stock tractors. All four tractors won the championship of their classes two years in a row. It was all about the competition. That’s what makes the world go ‘round,” Singer said. “When you start talking about the national level competitions, it is the same bunch of people that run the circuit. You run into them at each national event, and even some regional events over and over again.  A lot of the good competitors travel all over the country to compete against each other. Some even share trailers and they may be the best of friends off the track but they try to beat each other on the track at every event.  They loan parts off of their vehicles to help a fellow competitor out, but they are still focused on competing. That is just the way it is. It is a good bunch of people.”

Of course, the trucks, tractors and drivers get all of the attention at the pulls, but the excitement would not be possible without the sleds. Singer is the owner of Singer Sled Rental in Darke County and has a fairly unique perspective on pulling competitions in the region after a lifetime around tractor pulls and decades of working behind the scenes.

“I never really did a lot of pulling but I have always had an interest since I was really little. My dad always made sure we’d go watch. He never pulled but he liked to spectate and help put the event on,” Singer said. “We were putting on an event and a sled operator came in and asked if I knew anyone who wanted to purchase a sled. I made him an offer and it went from there and before long I owned a worn out, older pulling sled. That was in 2000 and it allowed me to get started.  We have since rebuilt and purchased other sleds. That first one cost $30,000, but today if you buy one they are $300,000 for a new one and that doesn’t include weights, the truck to pull it, scales or any of that.”

Singer farms full time with his brother and spends his winters hauling grain and scheduling events. The majority of his summers are spent on the road at pulls in Ohio, Indiana and surrounding states.

“We have 108 events booked for this year. Scheduling is tough because we do all that from December through April. You have to not only book the dates but you have to see if you can physically make it from one event to the next one and back to another one. Some events I can get there, but I can’t get back in time,” he said. “It gets tough in the spring because of planting season. Scheduling events in May and the first of June is always hectic, but you need to schedule events then to make the business work. In July we have a lot of pulls during the week because it is prime time fair season. My son runs a sled too. He drives truck for a living and works for a very understanding company.  They allow him to take a large number of days off work so that he can be running a sled.  I have four other people, with full-time jobs too, that help run the machines as well. I can’t do it alone, I’m too busy.  Last year I went 10 miles outside of Wheeling, to the suburbs of Chicago, then to a few miles outside of Tennessee, and finally to Bowling Green, Ohio. I appreciate everyone that helps both on and behind the scenes.”

In addition to the logistics of simply getting from place to place, Singer also must constantly monitor the details required for maintaining the sleds and hauling heavy loads over many miles.

“Most places we take one sled, but there are some venues that take two sleds. Sometimes we take a sled and someone else brings others,” Singer said. “You have to look stuff over after the shows so you are ready to go the next time. Sometimes things break, you can’t help it.  You just buckle down, be prepared to fix things and do it all over again the very next day.”

The sleds hook up like a detachable gooseneck trailer.

“I’ve got several semis for this and I use them for the farm work also. A sled weighs 32,000 pounds empty and every weight weighs 2,000 pounds. We carry eight to 11 weights while we are traveling to an event,” Singer said. “An unlimited modified tractor or super semi takes 13 or 14 weights to get them stopped. We can’t carry enough weight legally to stop some of this stuff. Normally if you’re at an event with that type of vehicle, there are two sleds there so you can borrow weights back and forth.”

Though the appeal of pulling has always been the power and competition, there have been changing trends through the years.

“Pickup trucks are very popular. The kids today didn’t grow up on John Deere 4020s and International 806s like we did, but they can relate to that pickup truck. Every kid, boy or girl, in rural America drives a pickup truck to school or wants one. They relate to trucks,” Singer said. “Personally, I like the tractors the best, but that is what I grew up with. Even the kids on farms that plant beans with a four-wheel drive tractor don’t relate that to a pulling tractor going down the track. But they relate to that pickup truck they drove home with. That is the trend of the future — trucks.”

The agricultural economy also has a significant influence on the popularity of pulls.

“There is a lot of agriculture involved with pulling.  When agriculture is good, pulling is very good. When prices are lower, like now, numbers fall off,” he said. “Events, competitors, and audiences change from year to year and you just have to adapt.”

The high dollar game of pulling competitions also depends on the success of the events that hold them.

“For fairs, it can be tough to draw spectators during the week and it takes spectators to pay the bills. Fairs need to make as much money as possible to pay the bills, and the way they do that is by getting people through the gate,” Singer said. “There are sponsorships, which are great and are helpful, but they do not cover everything.”

And while the crowd is cheering the pullers on the track, Singer enjoys the satisfaction of seeing his sleds perform the way they should night after night.

“I love the speed and the competition and trying to get the machines set so the fans, pullers, and promoters get the results they want. It’s a delicate balance.  If it is a 300-foot track I need to get them stopped in that range. You don’t want them stopping at 180 feet or 400 feet, so you have to know how to set your machine for each class that’s pulling.  We have standard settings that we use and then we go from there changing the gears, changing the drop on the pan, adding a weight or taking a weight out,” he said. “That is what my job is to get that desired result for the track.”

And once the smoke clears and the dust settles Singer loves to be a part of pulling because of the people.

“It is in my blood. My son was born going to pulls right away. My wife goes to some events and helps and thinks it is fun,” he said. “There are so many family and friends that help out along the way I couldn’t do it without them, from late night mechanical work, to the laser measurers who can’t move all day, and the numerous secretarial duties, everyone is greatly needed and appreciated. My best friends are in the pulling community, whether they are officials or competitors. These are people I know, people I like and this is where my family and friends are.”

SingerSledrental

Madison Madness London, Ohio Fair Pulls in Four Subregional Classes — EventPR

LondonOHWorthington, Ohio—Gold standard. Golden anniversary.

On Friday, July 12, the Madison County Fairgrounds in London, Ohio will host the Madison County Fair Pull as part of the 50th season of National Tractor Pullers Association Championship Pulling. The Regional National event will be conducted in one session to begin at 7 p.m.

In NTPA Championship Pulling, vehicles drag a 20-ton weight transfer sled along a straight, dirt track as the sled’s resistance increases. Within a class of similar vehicles, the puller who achieves the greatest distance is victorious. At events across the United States, elite competitors campaign their specialized machines—which resemble farm tractors, trucks, and dragsters—for chances at purse money and precious points toward end-of-season championships.

In 2019, the Association is proud to complete its first half century as the world’s original and number-one sanctioning organization for premier-level truck and tractor pulling contests. Fierce, fair pulling competition and a family-friendly, patriotic atmosphere are hallmarks of NTPA Championship Pulling. If you haven’t experienced the rumbles, roars, and rivalries of the heaviest sport on wheels, why not give it a try in London?

The Madison County Fair Pull will feature Regional National Light Pro Stock Tractors, Two-Wheel-Drive and Stainless Diesel Pro Stock Diesel 4×4 3.0 Trucks, and Multi-Engine Modifieds. All divisions will compete for titles in NTPA’s Region II, which encompasses Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio  (LT PS, TWD, and PSD 4×4: II-East; MOD: II-Southeast), and berths in the 33rd Enderle Memorial Pull-Off on Saturday, September 14 in Urbana, Ohio.

2018 champions expected in London are Kendall Houk of Lynchburg, Ohio («Nothing Special» LT PS), Brent and Kristie Secrest of Celina, OHio («Nuthin’ EZ ‘Bout It» TWD), Rob Wright of McArthur, Ohio («All Attitude» PSD 4×4 3.0), and Ryan Writsel of Orient, Ohio («Lucky Stryke» MOD).

Last year’s winners at the Madison County Fair Pull included Mike Palmer of Greenville, Ohio («Red Avenger» LT PS), Jacob Shephard of Brown City, Michigan («Alcohol Addiction Retapped» TWD), and Eric Widman of Republic, Ohio («Big Red» PSD 4×4 3.0).

For more information about the Madison County Fair Pull, visit the fair’s website, www.MadisonCountyFairOH.com. The Association’s Schedule page at www.NTPAPULL.com has links to event details, maps, and local weather reports for the Madison County Fair Pull and over 80 other events that constitute its historic 50th season.

About National Tractor Pullers Association

The NTPA is the sport’s oldest and most respected truck and tractor pulling sanctioning organization. Governed by a board of directors, the NTPA is managed by World Pulling International (WPI), an independently owned entity. Headquartered in Worthington, Ohio, the NTPA provides rules and regulations and the infrastructures required for organizations throughout the country to arrange truck and tractor pulls. The 2018 NTPA Championship Pulling Circuit was sponsored in part by Case IH, O’Reilly Auto Parts, Alliance Tire, Enderle Fuel Injection, MAC Trailer, Ag Protect 1, Shell Rotella, STOP-FYRE®, Cen-Pe-Co Lubricants, Columbus Diesel Supply, Heritage Iron, Stainless Diesel, Midwest Wheel Inc., the National Tractor Pulling Championships in Bowling Green, Ohio, PowerBore Cylinder Sleeves, Profab Machine Inc., the Budweiser Dairyland Super Nationals in Tomah, Wisconsin, and Riverside Engine Inc.

Watch the 14th season of «NTPA Championship Pulling» presented by Case IH: Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. Eastern/5:30 p.m. Central. Encore performances appear on Mondays at 12:30 a.m. and 6 a.m. Eastern. RFD-TV is available on satellite through DirecTV (345), Dish Network (231), and AT{amp}amp;T (568) along with Spectrum/Time Warner, Brighthouse, Comcast, Charter, Suddenlink, Cox, and other cable providers. Check your current provider for details or visit the channel finder at www.rfdtv.com. Stream RFD-TV on the Country Club service: www.rfdcc.com.

NTPA Live Streaming produced internet broadcasts of 13 national events in 2018. Visit WatchNTPA.com to purchase on-demand access to individual events or the $299 Season Pass—that’s less than $10 per session! NTPA Live Streaming’s new interface includes «Live DVR» controls and adaptive bitrate technology to promote an interruption-free broadcast. Check the site for lists of streamed events and compatible internet devices.

Subscribe to the Official Magazine of the NTPA! The Puller brings you the best in NTPA news, stories, and related pulling information. Tractor Supply Company (TSC) carries The Puller and the PULL! Official Program and Souvenir Yearbook.

Wear it loud! The NTPA’s Webmall has pulling apparel in fresh, new designs for fans of all ages and sizes. Hats, event shirts, hoodies, pins, and patches all sport the iconic NTPA shield that represents excellence in premier-level pulling. Event, TV series, and special DVDs let you watch pulling action on your schedule. See it all at ShopNTPA.com.

For more information about the NTPA, visit our website, www.NTPAPULL.com, follow us on social media at our Facebook page (ntpapulling), Twitter (@NTPApull), YouTube (NTPApull), and Instagram (ntpa), or call the NTPA office at 614.436.1761.

Full Pull Productions, Inc.
503 Spring Street
P.O. Box 363
Jamestown, PA 16134

Guest Post: You Just Got to Have Patience

Written by Ashley Majetic of Steel City Weight Pull Club: When I first got started in weight pull, I received several pieces of advice from many trainers, and competitive weight pullers. Some of that information came without prompting from random people online, or from folks who read on a forum somewhere that in order to have the “best dog”, I …

IWPA — International Weight Pull Association

The International Weight Pull association is a non-profit association that promotes the sport of dog pulling through well organized, sanctioned events. We have an elected Board of Directors.

The purpose of IWPA is to promote the working heritage of all dogs. The IWPA also promotes a program to keep your dog in good physical condition with a constructive outlet for canine competition.

Dog Pulling is akin to a tractor pull. Dogs compete to see who can pull the most weight 16 feet. They pull a wheeled cart on an earthen surface, or a sled on snow. The handler has no contact with the dog during the pull, so it is up to the dogs willingness to pull. Safety of the dog is of paramount concern. Since IWPA’s organization in 1984, no dogs have been hurt in competition.

IWPA was organized in November 1984 when a group of dog pulling enthusiasts saw a need for an organization to promote this specialized sport. Our season for sanctioned pulls runs from September through March. We currently sanction around one hundred pulls a season throughout the contiguous United States and Canada. Membership currently runs around 250 to 300 with around 400 to 600 dogs in competition. We are open to all dogs, mixed breed or purebred.

The objective of a competition is to see which dogs (within their weight class) can pull the most weight 16 feet within one minute. A tie is broken by the dog that pulled in the least amount of time on the preceding weight. Dogs compete within their own weight class, of which there are nine: 0-10#, 11-20#, 21-40#, 41-60#, 61-80#, 81-100#, 101-125# , 126-150#, 151#and over.

IWPA Weight Pull
Member dogs earn points based on their completion position and the number of dogs they beat. Their five best pulls are used in the total points for the season. They compete only within their weight class, and only within their region. Snow and wheeled competition are kept separate. At the end of the season, we hold National Championships and all first, second and third place dogs are invited.

We also have three levels of «Working Dog» Title Certificates that a dog can earn for pulling certain percentages of their weight. Many breed organizations accept IWPA Weight Pulls as legs toward for their own titles, as well.

We have twelve regions across North America, some with no activity (1 and 12 last year). We have yet to see any involvement outside of North America. A region can cover a large area. Following is a list of regions accompanied with a map, and a contact phone number {amp}amp; email link where applicable.

  1. Alaska, Yukon Territory Canada
  2. Washington, Oregon, Idaho, British Columbia (Sue Ferrari (509) 966-1133)
  3. Montana, Wyoming, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories (Sean Hammell (403) 619-0483)
  4. Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota,
    Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Manitoba (John Podolak 573-915-5132)
  5. Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania,
    Rhode Island, Vermont, New Brunswick,  Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec,
    Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island (Wendy Leister (717) 764-7052)
  6. Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio    (Shirley Webber (231) 258-2358)
  7. Alabama, Florida, Georgia,  Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina,
    Tennessee; (Debbie Lee (252) 357-0942)
  8. Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas (Clay Fonvielle 202-780-9527)
  9. Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico (Robbie Reed (970) 339-9264 )
  10. Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah (Jim Galli 530-518-0885)
  11. Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia (Valarie Thawley 302-366-8660 )
  12. Hawaii (Valarie Thawley 302-366-8660 )

You may travel vast distances to enter an event. Members around the Spokane area may attend pulls in Portland, Seattle and Idaho. On the East Coast, members travel from NY, PA, DE, VA and more to pulls. Each region varies. Members will typically travel from a few hundred to a thousand miles a season. And, you are not restricted to pulling in your region.

Pulls are usually organized by members that have built or acquired the necessary equipment and arranged for a site; frequently donated by some pet supply industry. You can become an organizer if you are willing to put together the necessary equipment, arrange a location (and maybe sponsors) and do the paperwork. We would love to see more events, and we would love to see some activity start in other countries.

IWPA Weight Pull

Come to one of our events and see what it is all about. Some organizers will conduct a novice pull after the sanctioned event where they will loan you a harness and give you and your dog some training. Also see our Overview of a Pull

Address further questions about IWPA to:
Brenda Lemon
or Membership questions to:
Rodney Martin
or Web site questions/comments to
Sheryl Franklin

Home | About Us | Getting Started | Overview of a Pull | Upcoming Events | Pull Results | Judges List | Rules | Points |
IWPA Championships | Forms | Members Corner | Contact Us | Photo Gallery | Hall of Fame |Links | Classifieds |

International Weight Pull Association
iwpa.net
© 1999-2015

If your dog already pulls, and you have a freight harness (has spreader bar behind dog); just show up at a pull. The fee is anywhere from $8 to $20 per day. It is set by the organizer to recover his cost. If you are a non-member, then there is an extra $5 per day fee levied per handler.

IWPA Novice Weight PullChecking It Out

Is weight pulling something in which you are interested? Find a pull near you and go observe. The organizers will be glad to answer any questions and provide you with literature. Take your dog. During a break, or after the pull, they «might» have time to loan you a harness and let you try your dog at pulling.

If they have offer novice pull, then enter it. This will give you a chance to see how your dog behaves and get first hand experience at the sport of pulling.

Also browse our Overview of a Pull to get a more detailed look of a weight pull event.

If you have any questions, please email us (Brenda Lemon) and we will endeavor to get an answer to you.

Equipment

The only equipment you really need to enter a sanctioned pull is a freight harness (has spreader bar behind dog). See the sources of equipment for acquiring a harness. It is important that you have a good collar (prong collars not allowed) and leash and that you keep good control of your dog (we have zero tolerance at dog fights; or apparent abuse of your dog). A dog that can «stay» is very important at a pull.

Training

Weight Pulling — A Basic Introduction by Missy Kehler — an excellent article with many good tips

As said above, we DO NOT TOLERATE dog fights; nor any action toward your dog that might be construed as cruel or abusive. You need to train (not coerce) your dog to pull. During a pull, you will connect your dog to the cart/sled, then quickly go across the finish line; whereupon you will command your dog to pull.

For actual pulling, you need to condition your dog to pulling something.

A common training aid is an old tire. Go to your local tire store and they will be glad to give you some old tires. Get some I-bolts and washers; and some kind of chain link devises. Drill a hole through the tread of the tire and connect the I-bolt with a washer. This can be connected to the dog’s harness to give him something to drag. You can also chain several tires together to increase the drag (weight) they are pulling.

You can train by pulling a light weight for long distances, or a heavy weight for very short distances.

Many people use chains to drag train. You can increase the number of chains to increase their muscle and endurance.

Another method is using a drag sled (see Equipment Resources). Drag sleds allow you to add weights to them to help build muscle and endurance.

Carts are another device for training. There are a few places you can buy carts (see Equipment Resources), or you can make your own. This is more akin to sledding. But, it can be more fun for your dog and it teaches him to pull. A sporting harness is more appropriate for cart pulling.

Never train on man made surfaces such as asphalt or concrete as this is bad for your dog’s feet. Train on natural surfaces such as grass or dirt.

Joining

If you wish to join the IWPA, you may send the membership form and fee to our Membership Chairman. Membership entitles you to the 9 newsletters published; voting rights; admittance to sanctioned pulls (organizer pull fees are extra); and competition points accumulated towards season standings within your region and weight class.

Download into your browser the membership form (opens in a new window) that is in PDF format, fill it out, print, and mail it to the indicated membership chair with the appropriate fee payable to the I.W.P.A.

Family vs. Individual membership: If you are interested in the competition, points are only awarded to dogs owned by members and dogs handled by members. If someone else in your family might handle the dog at a pull, you need a family membership. Otherwise, the dog and handler are entered as «provisional» and the points do not count. Family memberships do not include children 18 years of age and over. 18 year olds (or older) must join as individual members.

Questions

For general questions please email Brenda Lemon

Or please email or phone your Regional Representative

  1. Alaska, Yukon Territory Canada
  2. Washington, Oregon, Idaho, British Columbia (Sue Ferrari (509) 966-1133)
  3. Montana, Wyoming, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories (Sean Hammell (403) 619-0483)
  4. Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota,
    Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Manitoba (John Podolak 573-915-5132)
  5. Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania,
    Rhode Island, Vermont, New Brunswick,  Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec,
    Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island (Wendy Leister (717) 764-7052)
  6. Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio    (Shirley Webber (231) 258-2358)
  7. Alabama, Florida, Georgia,  Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina,
    Tennessee; (Debbie Lee (252) 357-0942)
  8. Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas (Clay Fonvielle 202-780-9527)
  9. Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico (Robbie Reed (970) 339-9264 )
  10. Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah (Jim Galli 530-518-0885
  11. Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia (Valarie Thawley 302-366-8660 )
  12. Hawaii (Valarie Thawley 302-366-8660 )

Address further questions about IWPA to:
Brenda Lemon
or Membership questions to:
Rodney Martin
or Web site questions/comments to
Sheryl Franklin

Home | About Us | Getting Started | Overview of a Pull | Upcoming Events | Pull Results | Judges List | Rules | Points |
IWPA Championships | Forms | Members Corner | Contact Us | Photo Gallery | Hall of Fame |Links | Classifieds |

International Weight Pull Association
iwpa.net
© 1999-2015

Weight Pull offers dogs an opportunity to perform a function that comes naturally to them — pulling enthusiastically.

In this event, dogs are harnessed and then pull a weighted cart or sled a predetermined distance, with one minute to do so. From small to large, any dog can excel at this sport!

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