Dustin Poirier | UFC

UFC Middleweight Rankings — Complete UFC fighter rankings

How are rankings determined?

Rankings were generated by a voting panel made up of media members. The media members were asked to vote for who they feel are the top fighters in the UFC by weight-class and pound-for-pound. A fighter is only eligible to be voted on if they are in active status in the UFC.

A fighter can appear in more than one weight division at a time. The champion and interim champion are considered to be in the top positions of their respective divisions and therefore are not eligible for voting by weight-class. However, the champions can be voted on for the pound-for-pound rankings.

If you are a member of the media and would like to apply to participate in the UFC fighter rankings, please send an email to rankings@ufc.com with your name, title, and the media outlet you represent.

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Watch The Full Version on UFC FIGHT PASS

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Watch The Full Version on UFC FIGHT PASS

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Watch The Full Version on UFC FIGHT PASS

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Watch The Full Version on UFC FIGHT PASS

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Watch The Full Version on UFC FIGHT PASS

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Watch The Full Version on UFC FIGHT PASS

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Watch The Full Version on UFC FIGHT PASS

The UFC Hall of Fame is a celebration of the pioneer, the trailblazer, the innovator and the visionary. It is a celebration of the DNA of UFC and mixed martial arts. The UFC Hall of Fame is separated into four distinct categories or “wings” commemorating specific achievements and contributions. These serve as differentiators and enable UFC to place Hall of Fame members in their appropriate historical context. 

Athletes who debuted in the Modern Era, on or after November 17, 2000
Forrest Griffin (inducted 2013)
Urijah Faber (inducted 2017)
Ronda Rousey (inducted 2018)
Athletes who debuted in the Pioneer Era, before November 17, 2000
Royce Gracie (inducted 2003)
Ken Shamrock (inducted 2003)
Dan Severn (inducted 2005)
Randy Couture (inducted 2006)
Mark Coleman (inducted 2008)
Chuck Liddell (inducted 2009)
Matt Hughes (inducted 2010)
Tito Ortiz (inducted 2012)
Pat Miletich (inducted 2014)

Dustin Poirier | UFC

Bas Rutten (inducted 2015)
Minotauro Nogueira (inducted 2016)
Maurice Smith (inducted 2017)
Kazushi Sakuraba (inducted 2017)
Matt Serra (inducted 2018)
Forrest Griffin vs Stephan Bonnar I, April 2005 (inducted 2014)
Matt Hughes vs Frank Trigg 2, April 2005 (inducted 2015)
Pete Williams vs Mark Coleman, May 1998 (inducted 2016)
Charles “Mask” Lewis (inducted 2009, posthumous)
Jeff Blatnick (inducted 2015, posthumous)
Bob Meyrowitz (inducted 2016)
Joe Silva (inducted 2017)
Bruce Connal (inducted 2018, posthumous)
Art Davie (inducted 2018)
UFC Rankings are comprised of all fighters currently signed to the UFC. RankingMMA has been publishing UFC rankings since 2006.

So, how do we compile our rankings? What separates us from other web sites that formulate rankings?

Here is our rankings criteria:
— Most recent performance
— Performance against top competition
— Estimated ability against future competition
— Strength of competition
— Activity in the last 3 years
— Last 5 fights

There are many fighters sporting undefeated records from developing fight scenes, especially abroad. Something we take into consideration is the strength of competition they have faced. If a fighter has compiled a bunch of wins against competition that is lackluster they will likely have a difficult time moving up in the rankings until they face stiffer competition in order for us to accurately predict how they would perform against exceedingly tougher competition.

If a fighter has fought elite competition and fallen short, we factor in how they performed. If a fighter fairs well against a higher-ranked adversary, they could still move up in the rankings.

Actual fight footage is reviewed, regardless of promotion in order to formulate our rankings.

= Fighter moves up in the rankings after recent fight
= Fighter moves down in the rankings after recent fight

Reasons a fighter is ineligible for UFC Rankings
= Inactivity over 15 months
= Changing weight classes. A fighter must debut in their new weight class in order to officially be ranked there. Upon their debut, they will be removed from their former weight class. If the fighter temporarily competed outside of their division, they will be ranked in their primary division unless the fighter states different.
= Suspension. Should a fighter be suspended for performance enhancing substances or fighter conduct, they will be removed from the rankings.
= Info Needed. A fighter has signed or re-signed with the UFC, but have yet to officially fight in the UFC.

How are UFC rankings calculated?

The UFC fighter rankings were introduced in February of 2013 and are generated by a voting panel made up of several media members. In order to rank these fighters, the media members are asked to vote who they feel are the top fighters as per the UFC by weight class and pound-for-pound.

The media members are only eligible to vote for a fighter if they are active in the UFC. A fighter is allowed to appear in more than one weight division at a time and the champion and the interim champion of a division are considered to be in the top position of the particular weight class.

  1. UFC Pound-for-Pound Rankings 2019
  2. UFC Flyweight Rankings 2019
  3. UFC Women’s Flyweight Rankings 2019
  4. UFC Bantamweight Rankings 2019
  5. UFC Women’s Bantamweight Rankings 2019
  6. UFC Featherweight Rankings 2019
  7. UFC Lightweight Rankings 2019
  8. UFC Welterweight Rankings 2019
  9. UFC Middleweight Rankings 2019
  10. UFC Light Heavyweight Rankings 2019
  11. UFC Heavyweight Rankings 2019
  12. UFC Women’s Strawweight Rankings 2019

The champions of a division are not eligible to be voted, however, the champions can be voted on for the pound-for-pound rankings.

Pound for pound is a ranking used in combat sports for boxing, wrestling, and mixed martial arts in order to decide who is the better fighter in relation to their weight (i.e., adjusted to compensate for weight class).

Rankings Weight Classes Player Win/Loss Record
1 UFC Light Heavyweight Champion Jon Jones 25-1-0(1)
2 UFC Lightweight Champion Khabib Nurmagomedov 28-0-0
3 UFC Flyweight/Bantamweight Champion Henry Cejudo 15-2-0
4 UFC Heavyweight Champion Stipe Miocic 19-3-0
5 UFC Bantamweight/Featherweight champion Amanda Nunes (T) 18-4-0
5 UFC Heavyweight Daniel Cormier (T) 22-2-0(1)
7 UFC Featherweight Champion Max Holloway 21-4-0
8 UFC Middleweight Champion Israel Adesanya 18-0-0
9 UFC Lightweight Tony Ferguson 25-3-0
10 UFC Welterweight Champion Kamaru Usman 15-1-0
11 UFC Flyweight Champion Valentina Shevchenko 17-3-0
12 UFC Lightweight Conor McGregor 21-4-0
13 UFC Lightweight Dustin Poirier 25-6-0(1)
14 UFC Middleweight Robert Whittaker 20-5-0
15 UFC Welterweight Champion Tyron Woodley 19-4-1

Demetrious Johnson defeated Joseph Benavidez in 2012, at UFC 152 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada in the finale of a 4-man tournament for the inaugural UFC Flyweight Title.

Johnson lost the championship to Henry Cejudo at UFC 227, as the latter ended Mighty Mouse’s reign of 2,142 days.

What are the UFC Flyweight Rankings? Check below:

Rankings Fighter Win/Loss Record Age
Champion Henry Cejudo 15-2-0 32
1 Joseph Benavidez 28-5-0 34
2 Jussier Formiga 23-6-0 34
3 Deiveson Figueiredo 17-1-0 31
4 Alexandre Pantoja 21-4-0 29
5 Sergio Pettis 18-5-0 25
6 Brandon Moreno 15-5-1 25
7 Kai Kara France (T) 20-7-0(1) 26
7 Rogerio Bontorin (T) 16-1-0(1) 27
9 Tim Elliot 15-9-1 32
10 Matt Schnell 14-4-0 29

The inaugural UFC Women’s Flyweight Title fight was contested in December in Las Vegas, Nevada at The Ultimate Fighter: A New World Champion finale. The inaugural title fight was between two fighters who appeared on the 26th season of The Ultimate Fighter, as Nicco Montano defeated Roxanne Modafferi to win become the inaugural champion.

What are the UFC Women’s Flyweight Rankings? Check below:

Rankings Fighter Win/Loss Record Age
Champion Valentina Shevchenko 18-3-0 31
1 Katlyn Chookagian 12-2-0 30
2 Jessica Eye  14-7-0(1) 32
3 Joanne Calderwood 14-4-0 32
4 Liz Carmouche 13-7-0 35
5 Jennifer Maia 17-5-1 30
6 Viviane Araújo 8-1-0 32
7 Andrea Lee 11-3-0 30
8 Roxanne Modafferi 23-16-0 36
9 Lauren Murphy 11-4-0 35
10 Alexis Davis 19-10-0 34

Prior to UFC-WEC merger, Dominick Cruz was the WEC Bantamweight Champion. At WEC 53, Cruz defeated Scott Jorgensen to retain the WEC Bantamweight Championship and was simultaneously awarded the inaugural UFC Bantamweight Championship.

At UFC 173, T.J. Dillashaw defeated Renan Barao to win the UFC Bantamweight Championship. At UFC Fight Night: Dillashaw vs Cruz, Dominick Cruz became the first-ever two-time Bantamweight Champion. At UFC 207, Cruz lost the title to Cody Garbrandt, who eventually lost it to Dillashaw, making the latter a two-time division champion.

At UFC 238, Henry Cejudo defeated T.J. Dillashaw to win the Bantamweight Championship.

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