What weight would this equal?

Knitting With Yarn Held Double {amp}gt; LB Handknits

Yes, you may use two strands of a finer weight yarn held together to approximate the gauge of a thicker yarn. The following are approximate equivalents; however, as with all substitutions, you should check to make sure you’re obtaining gauge. For our FAQ on gauge, please click here.

  • 2 strands fingering = one strand sportweight
  • 2 strands sport = one strand worsted weight
  • 2 strands worsted = one strand chunky to super bulky weight*

*2 strands of a lighter worsted yarn (e.g. Wool-Ease or Fishermen’s Wool) held together may approximate the thickness of a chunky yarn, while 2 strands of a heavier worsted weight yarn (e.g. Vanna’s Choice) held together may approximate the thickness of a super bulky yarn. Because of this range, again, we recommend that you should make a gauge swatch to test.

Why don’t you try a swatch to see if you can get the gauge/tension you need with the yarn you want to use?

This is from the Lion Brand Site.

http://www.lionbrand.com/faq/16.html?language=

About Yarn: Can I combine two strands of one weight to equal a larger weight?

Yes, you may use two strands of a finer weight yarn held together to approximate the gauge of a thicker yarn.

The following are approximate equivalents; however, as with all substitutions, you should check to make sure you’re obtaining gauge. For our FAQ on gauge, please click here.

2 strands fingering = one strand sportweight
2 strands sport = one strand worsted weight
2 strands worsted = one strand chunky to super bulky weight*

*2 strands of a lighter worsted yarn (e.g. Wool-Ease or Fishermen’s Wool) held together may approximate the thickness of a chunky yarn, while 2 strands of a heavier worsted weight yarn (e.g. Vanna’s Choice) held together may approximate the thickness of a super bulky yarn. Because of this range, again, we recommend that you should make a gauge swatch to test.

This is another site.

http://jo2308.typepad.com/blissedoutknitting/2007/07/combining-knitt.html

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What weight would this equal?

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What weight would this equal?laurelarts(a regular here)

courier770 wrote:

While I use double strands all the time, I don’t do it to «equal» another weight. I’ll use a strand of sock weight and add a strand of mohair for an interesting blend to make a unique scarf.

One of the problems in using multiple strands is that they don’t always exactly equal the weight you are trying to achieve. This is because the strands are not «plied» together so you get a little more «loft» and that can affect gauge.

Swatching is the best way to see what you will get.

While I use double strands all the time, I don’t d… (

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Absolutely I agree with swatching….I also use the different weights together to get unique textures and designs….very interesting.

What weight would this equal?Loramarin

Holding two lace weights strands together will not give you DK. It will be a gorgeous light fabric probably closer to fingering or a light sport. Swatch Swatch Swatch!!!

3mom wrote:

The pattern I’m thinking of calls for a DK, or sport, weight. If I use two lace wgt. strands together, would that be the same? Would two DK together be the same as a worsted?

You will most likely be closer to DK with two strands of fingering/baby/sock weight yarn. Two strands of DK is going to be heavy worsted (Aran) or closer to a chunky/bulky weight yarn.

What weight would this equal?wiffy

Hi! Trish 2222 Nice to see someone else here from Scotland. I am from outside Paisley in Elderslie so not that far away from you.

What weight would this equal?sandyP
What weight would this equal?3mom

OK, so the concensus is to swatch. Guess I will do that (sigh).

What weight would this equal?courier770

Even within the same «weight» of yarn, you will get varied gauge results due to «loft». Doubling or tripling strands can increase the loft so swatching is really practical.

What weight would this equal?5mmdpns

Colorado knits wrote:

It seems that there is a wide variation in all of the yarn weights. For instance, not all sport weights are the same; not all worsted weights are the same — same with all the yarns.

Swatching is the only accurate way to know.

Absolutely right about that one!!! here is a chart to help figure out where to start.
http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/weight.html

What weight would this equal?nanaof3

Yep…do a gauge..best suggestion…check that gauge.

What weight would this equal?Patty Sutter(a regular here)

3mom wrote:

The pattern I’m thinking of calls for a DK, or sport, weight. If I use two lace wgt. strands together, would that be the same? Would two DK together be the same as a worsted?

I think 2 sport would be a little heavier than DK, more like «worsted/aran weight». To equal DK you may need one sport weight and one lace weight. So really if «worstes/aran weight» is too heavy, it would probably be easier to just buy a DK.

http://www.crochetmagazine.com/images/misc/standards-yarnweight.jpg

What weight would this equal?tatsfieldknitter

Hello — just checked out this site from Co. Durham — very good and accurate. I always remember that pre-war most yarn for jumpers etc was 4ply — when double knitting came in (ie double the 4ply) it was joyful as it knitted up soooo much quicker. So just remember you can double up on 4 ply (and even 3ply) to make the equivalent of DK

I recommend the site for all sorts of conversions.

Carol

What weight would this equal?Patty Sutter(a regular here)
What weight would this equal?5mmdpns

tatsfieldknitter wrote:

Hello — just checked out this site from Co. Durham — very good and accurate. I always remember that pre-war most yarn for jumpers etc was 4ply — when double knitting came in (ie double the 4ply) it was joyful as it knitted up soooo much quicker. So just remember you can double up on 4 ply (and even 3ply) to make the equivalent of DK

I recommend the site for all sorts of conversions.

Carol

Those of us who are in North America need to remember that the UK, Australia, and New Zealand have a different yarn measurement system than ours. So it is not an automatic cross-over when the term dk or double knit is used. In North America it refers to one thing and in the other countries it means something totally different! :-)

3mom wrote:

OK, so the concensus is to swatch. Guess I will do that (sigh).

Yes, much as it is a PITA, in this case where you are combining smaller grist yarns, a swatch is essential.

What weight would this equal?courier770

Swatching IS a PITA! Though when I swatch, I go one extra step. I’ll take photo of the swatch with rulers clearly present in the photo, print it out and place it in my knitting journal with notations about the yarn and needle size used. More than once it’s saved me having to go through the whole process a 2nd time.

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What weight would this equal?

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What weight would this equal?Jeanie L

courier770 wrote:

Swatching IS a PITA! Though when I swatch, I go one extra step. I’ll take photo of the swatch with rulers clearly present in the photo, print it out and place it in my knitting journal with notations about the yarn and needle size used. More than once it’s saved me having to go through the whole process a 2nd time.

What a great idea..Thanks

What weight would this equal?courier770

My knitting journal has become a treasured item! Just taking the time to tape a photo, yarn label, small piece of yarn and making a few notes has saved me time and time again. Even negative notes like «I hated working with this yarn» and listing the reasons can come in handy.

Whew. This has been an interesting learning topic. Now I have a question. Suppose you have bought yarn that does not have a label telling you what weight of yarn it is. How can one tell what weight it is. E.g. I bought some yarn at one of Spinrite’s tent sales. The colours were gorgeous, so I went «belly-up». Unfortunately, I have no clue what weight it is. I know when I unravel it, it is 3 strands.

What weight would this equal?sexxysuee

what i usually do is to wool wined the two strands together to get a better twist i find that is knits up better
but i usually mixed my colours to make it interesting

What weight would this equal?courier770

crjc..since I don’t know where you are located (US, Canada or Europe)and I’m not familiar with the company my suggestions may fall short of your needs. Obviously it’s a 3 ply yarn but depending on where (country) it was produced it could be any weight. Using wraps per inch, either using a ruler or a spinners wraps per inch tool will give you a better idea of what you have. You could also try a simple «side by side» test..take a piece of it and hold it side by side against other yarns to judge the thickness of it.

courier770 wrote:

crjc..since I don’t know where you are located (US, Canada or Europe)and I’m not familiar with the company my suggestions may fall short of your needs. Obviously it’s a 3 ply yarn but depending on where (country) it was produced it could be any weight. Using wraps per inch, either using a ruler or a spinners wraps per inch tool will give you a better idea of what you have. You could also try a simple «side by side» test..take a piece of it and hold it side by side against other yarns to judge the thickness of it.

crjc..since I don’t know where you are located (US… (

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Hi Courier, I am in Canada. Also how are your grandbaby and DIL doing? I sincerely hope they are both basking is the abundance of health.

:D

What weight would this equal?courier770

Why thank you so much for asking! Baby «Wonder» is up to a strapping 7 lbs and the subject of his fathers camera «pranks»…posing him with Golf Digest magazine, holding the TV remote, wearing Chicago Bears outfits, putting a fortune cookie on his head..all that cute stuff. don’t ask about the cookie I don’t quite get it myself.

DIL had a set back and had her gall bladder removed a couple weeks ago, though she does seem to be doing well.

Thanks again for asking.

Since you are in Canada, I’m going to make the obvious suggestion..it’s a 3 ply yarn that «might» be a lace weight!? Isn’t four ply, a sock weight by European standards? *scratches head*

courier770 wrote:

Why thank you so much for asking! Baby «Wonder» is up to a strapping 7 lbs and the subject of his fathers camera «pranks»…posing him with Golf Digest magazine, holding the TV remote, wearing Chicago Bears outfits, putting a fortune cookie on his head..all that cute stuff. don’t ask about the cookie I don’t quite get it myself.

DIL had a set back and had her gall bladder removed a couple weeks ago, though she does seem to be doing well.

Thanks again for asking.

Why thank you so much for asking! Baby «Wond… (

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You are most welcome. I am happy to hear Master «Wonder» is doing quite well. Praise the Lord for answering prayers. Nevermind, your DIL will be just fine. Take good care and have a blessed and peaceful evening.

courier770 wrote:

Why thank you so much for asking! Baby «Wonder» is up to a strapping 7 lbs and the subject of his fathers camera «pranks»…posing him with Golf Digest magazine, holding the TV remote, wearing Chicago Bears outfits, putting a fortune cookie on his head..all that cute stuff. don’t ask about the cookie I don’t quite get it myself.

DIL had a set back and had her gall bladder removed a couple weeks ago, though she does seem to be doing well.

Thanks again for asking.

Since you are in Canada, I’m going to make the obvious suggestion..it’s a 3 ply yarn that «might» be a lace weight!? Isn’t four ply, a sock weight by European standards? *scratches head*

Why thank you so much for asking! Baby «Wond… (

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Girl, I have no clue about those things. I am definitely not an expert when it comes to yarns. If the label is not on, I am clueless. Ask me about crochet thread, I think I am much better at recognizing the guage. I am not one of those people who will buy yarn without a pattern and know what pattern to knit it with. I have to have the pattern and buy the suggested yarn. Dumb I guess, but that’s the way it is with me. Worsted, I definitely know. Anythingelse — forget it.

crjc wrote:

Whew. This has been an interesting learning topic. Now I have a question. Suppose you have bought yarn that does not have a label telling you what weight of yarn it is. How can one tell what weight it is. E.g. I bought some yarn at one of Spinrite’s tent sales. The colours were gorgeous, so I went «belly-up». Unfortunately, I have no clue what weight it is. I know when I unravel it, it is 3 strands.

You know, I got to thinking in between students (thinking at work can be a stretch some days and it is Monday) about this, and let me make a suggestion. If you know the needle range of the different weights of yarn (easier to look up than an unknown yarn) take a needle gauge and your yarn. Fold a length of the tail in half and starting at the large end of the needle gauge push the fold through the holes until you get down to the hole it fills up completely. This will give you the needle size it may work best with, from that you can get a good idea in the needle range for different grists of yarn what this is likely to be. Spinners often use this for handspun yarn when they don’t have a consisent wpi count or they just don’t have a wrap gauge at hand.

What weight would this equal?phoenix knitter

That’s a great idea….hadn’t thought of a yarn journal, let alone a pictorial one…. :thumbup:

What weight would this equal?5mmdpns

courier770 wrote:

Since you are in Canada, I’m going to make the obvious suggestion..it’s a 3 ply yarn that «might» be a lace weight!? Isn’t four ply, a sock weight by European standards? *scratches head*

Here is another article comparing the number of plys and the terms for determining the weights of yarns. It is not in chart format.
http://suite101.com/article/yarnweight-a680

Here is another in chart form.
http://www.woolandyarn.co.uk/wool-types-c16.html

ditto on the swatching.

I finished knitting a scarf which asked for 2 different 2 plys to be used. It is still a very light scarf, because it equals 4 ply. The next yarn size in Aussie is a 5 ply which is slightly thicker than the 4 ply and smaller than the 8 ply.

I have found that DK yarn from the UK, is similar to 4 ply in USA. All my patterns are from UK, as that’s where I’m from, and I use 4 ply every time the pattern calls for DK. I use worsted weight for my Aran patterns. Works well.

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Close to worsted. You have to do a swatch.

The 1,2, 3, 4, 5 etc weight system is almost additive, so that 1 1=2, 1 2=3, 2 2=4. But, 4 4 =5 which is but one exception to the rule. Here, you switch rules to another one where 2 worsteds = a bulky. 2 bulky = super bulky and 4 worsteds = super bulky.

The range within sizes is so great that you never know what 2 yarns are comparable to until you test with a swatch. I always use the additive method even though I know it isn’t correct because it so often works, and a swatch tells me the true story.

See this info from WEBS:

http://blog.yarn.com/tuesdays-knitting-tip-working-with-multiple-strands-of-yarn/

Being able to do this kind of ‘translation’  is of course very handy when it comes to yarn substitutions. For instance, say a pattern calls for a DK weight yarn, but you don’t have any in a suitable colour/ composition — yet you have the perfect fingering weight yarn, you know that you can hold that fingering weight yarn double to achieve the yarn weight the pattern calls for.

Conversely, let’s say a pattern — like my Harvest Season hat — calls for a fingering weight yarn held double, but you don’t have any suitable fingering weight yarn. You check the pattern info and see the suggested yarn has a meterage of 420m per 100g. Held double, that is the equivalent of 210m per 100g, or DK weight. You can therefore knit this hat with DK weight yarn, held single stranded. 

Make sense?

All that being said, a couple of things to be aware of:

A yarn weight achieved by holding a thinner yarn double, may not feel or behave exactly like a yarn that was spun and plied to that weight to begin with. In some cases the resulting fabric will be ‘flatter.’ In other cases, quite the opposite — it can feel overly thick or puffy. Without getting too technical, this is to do with ply and twist and the way air gets trapped between strands, and all manner of other fascinating things related to spinning. So before you decide to substitute, say, an aran-weight yarn a pattern calls for, with a sport weight yarn held double, be sure to swatch at the stated gauge and just see whether you like the way the fabric is knitting up.

Aside from this, some knitters claim that knitting with yarn held double is ‘not economical’ as far as meterage. However, I believe this idea is based on a misguided comparison to knitting with the yarn held single! Once you hold the yarn double, of course it’s no longer going to yield the meterage stated on the label; it’s going to yield exactly half that meterage — which makes it no more or less economical than knitting with a yarn of the weight we are aiming for.

Basically, by holding a yarn double, we are converting it to a yarn that is twice its original thickness and half its original meterage. As long as we grasp that principle, all will be well! 

Current Knitting

I’m working on a new design — here’s a sneak peek.

This is the same yarn you see above in the 2 yarn cakes. Isn’t it pretty?

It’s going to be on display at Stitches West (Santa Clara Convention Center Feb. 19-21, 2016) at The Altered Stitch booth. Come and see it!

Have lots of fingering weight stash, but want to knit warm cozy hats? Read on for a solution!

Sometimes
you may want to knit a piece that calls for a heavier yarn than what you  may have on hand. Or perhaps you have lots of
stash of beautiful lightweight yarn that you want to use, but it’s not right for the
pattern you want to make.

For
example, I got it into my head to make cozy slippers for my grandkids, son, and
daughter-in-law, after seeing a cute pattern, and I wanted to make them out of
bulky yarn.

Surprise,
out of all the hundreds of yarns in my stash, there is very little in bulky
weight. It’s about two-thirds fingering weight. Probably because, living in
California, I have no need for heavy knits.

So I
did some research to find out more about doubling up yarn so that you can use lighter
weights of yarn to substitute for a heavier yarn.

This
is what I found. Remember it’s always wise to make a gauge swatch, because even
among several fingering weight or sport weight yarns, there is some variation.
They’re not all the same. 

But
having said that, there are some guidelines.

The following are approximate;
however, as with all substitutions, you should check to make sure you’re happy
with the gauge. 

First Method 

Proceed as follows:

2 strands fingering = one strand
sport weight
2 strands sport = one strand worsted weight

2 strands DK = one strand bulky
2 strands worsted = one strand bulky to super bulky weight*

*2 strands of a lighter worsted
yarn held together may approximate the thickness of a chunky or bulky yarn,
while 2 strands of a heavier worsted weight yarn held together may come close
to the thickness of a super bulky yarn.

Second Method

You
can also use a simple calculation:

Take the regular
gauge of a yarn, e.g. 7 sts per inch or 28 sts for 4 inches for a heavy-ish sock yarn and
multiply it by 70% (or 0.7).
7 sts per inch x 0.7 = 4.9 sts per inch
This will give you an approximate idea of the gauge you can achieve
when doubling the yarn up.

Just
remember it’s always a good idea to do a gauge swatch. Not only to see if the
gauge comes out right, but to check that you like the look of the fabric: not
too stiff, not too drapey for your purposes.

Want to get useful tips like this regularly (once or twice a month)? Sign up for my newsletter (top right of the screen) and get them delivered to your inbox, along with other knitting related info. 
Sign up now and get a free pattern!

P.S. Here is some pretty yarn to look at, from The Flying Kettle yarns.

Sources:
Lion Brand website, TinCanKnits blog 

New Projects

Here is one of my new designs. The Contender Hat is a cozy cabled hat that can be made in a masculine color to suit one of the men in your life, or can be knitted just for you!  It needs just one skein of 100g of DK weight yarn. It was featured in the 2015 Men in Knitwear Calendar.

Mr September is a knockout. To keep warm during training sessions he
sports a handsome hat featuring an unusual garter cable on a background
of cushy warm garter stitch.
The ribbed border is long enough to be turned up for extra w

armth.

The hat can be made in a slouchy style if desired.

Pattern is both written and charted and has been professionally tech-edited, for a more pleasant knitting experience. 

More of my designs can be found HERE, if you’re looking for something to knit with your doubled yarn. :-)

Current Knitting 

I’m working on a new design — here’s a sneak peek.

This is the same yarn you see above in the 2 yarn cakes. Isn’t it pretty?

It’s going to be on display at Stitches West (Santa Clara Convention Center Feb. 19-21, 2016) at The Altered Stitch booth. Come and see it!

New Projects

Here is one of my new designs. The Contender Hat is a cozy cabled hat that can be made in a masculine color to suit one of the men in your life, or can be knitted just for you!  It needs just one skein of 100g of DK weight yarn. It was featured in the 2015 Men in Knitwear Calendar.

Mr September is a knockout. To keep warm during training sessions he
sports a handsome hat featuring an unusual garter cable on a background
of cushy warm garter stitch.
The ribbed border is long enough to be turned up for extra w

armth.

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